Bachelors of Arts in Architecture

The  Architecture  major  creates  a  rich  academic  environment  marked  by  the  confluence  of  advanced  practice,  contemporary  theory, and  social  engagement.  Our  primary  goal  is  to  help  students  develop  the  capacity  and  judgment  necessary  to  understand  the  built environment and generate architecture as a critical response, so that each student can engage both the discipline of architecture and the multiple discourses – artistic, technological, social, political, environmental, economic, spiritual – necessary to be a successful practitioner and a conscientious citizen with a Biblical worldview.

The Bachelor of Arts in Architecture at CBU is intended as a degree that will allow a student to proceed onto graduate studies, or into the workforce, in architecture or another discipline. It is not designed to be an accredited, professional degree and therefore does not satisfy the qualifications for licensure as an architect in most states in the U.S

General Education Courses

The general education requirements will follow the curriculum set forth for other university programs. Some general education requirements will be met through specific architecture major requirements. All university general education competency requirements must be met before beginning the program outlined below.

Lower Division Requirements

DES 110 Design Thought Foundations I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will be an introduction to 2D design thinking, as applied to the interrelated, interdisciplinary fields of design and as understood from a biblical world-view. Basic design theories, principles, major movements and works will be covered. Basic creative approaches and design expressions are explored through projects, class discussions, field trips and lectures. This course is an introduction to the design paths available through the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, but also serves non-design majors interested in discovering design.

ARC 120 Design Communications

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The course will establish a base of design concepts and knowledge with an introduction to references and ideas to foster independent inquiry. The course will develop foundational appreciation and skills for effective two dimensional visual expression through graphic representation.

ARC 122 Design Communications

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The course will establish a base of design concepts and knowledge with an introduction to references and ideas to foster independent  inquiry. The course  will develop foundational appreciation and skills for effective three-dimensional (3D) visual expression through graphic representation. Prerequisite: ARC 120. Pre- or Co- Requisite: DES 110.

ARC 210 Design Studio I

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

The  studio  explores  and  develops  conceptual  strategies  for  basic  formal  and  spatial  design,  emphasizing  the  role  of ordering principles and of fundamental architectonic elements in the implementation of design intentions. Students also will be introduced to foundational processes for developing design projects through the application of formal analytical vocabulary, diagramming, drawing methods and conventions, and three-dimensional modeling. Prerequisite: ARC 122.

ARC 212 Design Studio II

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The studio focuses on conceptualization and implementation of architectural ideas in response to environment, landscape, site and enclosure, as applied to a specific program and building type. Students will continue to develop the foundational design processes introduced in previous studios, and will be introduced to the role of rigorous precedent analysis in the generation of architectural ideas. Prerequisite: ARC 210.

 

ARC 220 Computer Modeling

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course will be an advanced course to develop an awareness and understanding of the role of Building Information Modeling in the student’s ability to study design ideas and present those ideas in the various design disciplines. Emphasis will be on the relationship of computer graphics with the design process. Prerequisite: ARC 120.

ARC 240 Architectural History I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The course will cover formal, theoretical, material, pragmatic and conceptual aspects of architecture, cities and art, examined in relation to their cultural contexts, from pre-history to circa 1400.

ARC 242 Architectural History II

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course will cover formal, theoretical, material, pragmatic and conceptual aspects of architecture, cities and art, examined in relation to their cultural contexts, from circa 1400 to the present. Prerequisite: ARC 240.

ARC 280 Materials and Methods

Units: 4. Offered: Spring.

Introduction to materials and methods of the construction of buildings emphasizing the integration of design and technology.  Includes comprehensive introduction to the construction of buildings and their systems, materials and methods, and their implications on building sustainability and design decision-making. Common construction methods and details are introduced. Material applications in structural and non-structural building components are explored. CAD and BIM systems are used to develop construction documents for a case study building. Skills developed include analysis of  building  form  and  function,  understanding  design and material selection interrelationships, and communication of ideas through drawing.

MAT 145 Mathematical Methods in the Natural Sciences

Units: 4. Offered: Spring.

A calculus-based course including an introduction to derivatives and integrals, dimensional analysis, analytical geometry, trigonometry, vectors, experimental error and other topics to provide a mathematical foundation for natural science majors. Prerequisite: MAT 115, 135 or sufficient SAT, ACT or math placement exam scores and appropriate high school mathematics background.

PHY 115 Physics for Architects

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

A study of mathematical methods of physics, kinematics, forces, Newton’s Laws, earthquakes, fluids, work, energy, power, momentum, heat and thermodynamics, electricity, waves, light, and sound. This class will be taught in an “Inquiry- Based” manner. Lecture and lab are integrated. Additional lab fee. Prerequisites: MAT 135, 145, or 245.

Upper Division Requirements

ARC 310 Design Studio III

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

The studio focuses on conceptualization and implementation of architectural ideas throughout the  process of pre-design, programmatic development, site design, and building design. Emphasis will be placed on architectural design as an interpretation and accommodation of various human activities through the exploration of program, perception, scale, proportion, life- safety code and accessibility requirements. Students will continue to develop the design processes introduced in previous studios. Prerequisite: ARC 212.

ARC 312 Design Studio IV

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The studio draws upon the three previous courses in the studio sequence, emphasizing the integrative nature of architectural design. Students will develop and demonstrate their abilities to conceptualize and implement building designs that bring together basic design principles, structural and envelope systems, environmental systems, programmatic and building service systems and egress, through the design of housing. Prerequisite: ARC 310.

ARC 370 Professional Preparation

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

Professional Preparation provides an introduction to the profession of architecture through an 1) exploration of the structures of practice including how an office functions and expectations of internship experience;  2)  exploration of a critical position of the student in relationship to their design work resulting in the craft of portfolio production; 3) development of professional skills and documents required to obtain a job in professional  practice setting; and 4) examination of leadership skills as applied within an architectural practice setting. Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean.

ARC 380 Thermal and Environmental Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course deals with the thermal and environmental processes which effect buildings and how the designer responds to or manipulates the thermal environment. It is necessary for the architect to understand those  processes, the human response to them and the impact of them. The class will be organized around the why, what and how of these issues and processes. Prerequisite: PHY 115.

ARC 385 Luminous and Sonic Environmental Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course deals with those building elements that pertain to the visual and aural conditioning for the purposes of human use and comfort. The basic principles of light (natural and electrical) and acoustical systems, their integration with other building systems and the impact on the aesthetics of design will be stressed. Plumbing and electrical systems also will be presented. The sustainability of various systems will be explored.

ARC 393 Structural Systems I

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

Introductory course in statics and strengths of materials for architects.  The course provides both qualitative understanding and quantitative understanding, but places a specific focus on the conceptual relationships between structure and form.  Topics include static systems, tension / compression, bending and shear stress, combined stresses, strain, cross-sectional considerations, and the physical behavior of structural materials  and systems. Additionally, this course integrates the above material with design studio processes via course projects and course format. Prerequisite: MAT 145 or 245.

ARC 410 Design Studio V

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

This course is an advanced design studio that assumes a high level of proficiency in design process and representation, as well as in other content areas developed in previous studios. This studio focuses on the conceptualization and implementation of comprehensive architectural design.  Students will be expected to draw upon all previous coursework in order to thoroughly develop a project from a detailed program. Emphasis will be placed on the elaboration of architectural ideas through integration and syntheses of structural, environmental, envelope, building assemblies, life-safety systems and the principles of sustainability. Prerequisite: ARC 312. Pre- or Co- Requisites: ARC 480 and 493.

ARC 480 Advanced Sustainable Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course will explore the history, goals, methods of design, quantification, and holistic integration of sustainable systems in architecture. Specific topics include design strategies for energy reduction, passive heating and cooling, comparative energy  modeling, photovoltaic systems, envelope design, life cycle analysis, and sustainable vernacular architecture. Through readings, lectures, research, and projects, students will develop the theoretical framework and technical skills to implement fundamental sustainable strategies in architectural design and to evaluate their impact. Prerequisite: ARC 380.

ARC 493 Structural Systems II

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

Introduction to and application of a systems approach of structural design and analysis of buildings for architects. Topics include considerations of steel, concrete, timber, and long-spans structures.  Introduction to structural analysis including introduction to typical structural analysis computer programs.  Integration of course material with design studio processes via course projects and course format. Prerequisite: ARC 393.

ENT 357 Small Business Management

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This is a practice-oriented course covering major facets of small business with special focus on starting, financing, marketing, operating, and leading the people in a small business. Special emphasis is given to entrepreneurship and small business development.