Architecture

Architecture

Know How, Know Why

The Architecture major creates a rich academic environment marked by the confluence of advanced practice, contemporary theory, and social engagement. Our primary goal is to help students develop the capacity and judgment necessary to understand the built environment and generate architecture as a critical response, so that each student can engage both the discipline of architecture and the multiple discourses – artistic, technological, social, political, environmental, economic, spiritual – necessary to be a successful practitioner and a conscientious citizen with a Biblical worldview.

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Architecture Degrees

CBU Architecture offers two degrees: Pre-professional 4 year Bachelors of Architecture, and professional single institution 5-year Master of Architecture degrees.  See Accreditation tab for further information on M.Arch degree accreditation.

Optional Graduate Architectural Concentrations

CBU Architecture offers four optional concentrations, allowing students to specialize and distinguish themselves as architects who demonstrate professional excellence and personal integrity, are servant leaders in their communities and who live biblically-based, missional lives within the profession.

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Student Work

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At CBU Architecture, I have found a community of seekers; individuals who love to think deeply and reflect on the purpose of everything we do. We truly want to use our talents in architecture to serve our community and place people at the center of the built environment.   — Josh Greene, Senior

Meet the Faculty

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B.A. Architecture

The Bachelor of Arts in Architecture at CBU is intended as a degree that will allow a student to proceed onto graduate studies, or into the workforce, in architecture or another discipline. It is not designed to be an accredited, professional degree and therefore does not satisfy the qualifications for licensure as an architect in most states in the U.S

General Education Courses

The general education requirements will follow the curriculum set forth for other university programs. Some general education requirements will be met through specific architecture major requirements.

Lower Division Requirements

DES 110 Design Thought Foundations I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will be an introduction to 2D design thinking, as applied to the interrelated, interdisciplinary fields of design and as understood from a biblical world-view. Basic design theories, principles, major movements and works will be covered. Basic creative approaches and design expressions are explored through projects, class discussions, field trips and lectures. This course is an introduction to the design paths available through the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, but also serves non-design majors interested in discovering design.

ARC 120 Design Communications

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The course will establish a base of design concepts and knowledge with an introduction to references and ideas to foster independent inquiry. The course will develop foundational appreciation and skills for effective two dimensional visual expression through graphic representation.

ARC 122 Design Communications

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The course will establish a base of design concepts and knowledge with an introduction to references and ideas to foster independent  inquiry. The course  will develop foundational appreciation and skills for effective three-dimensional (3D) visual expression through graphic representation. Prerequisite: ARC 120. Pre- or Co- Requisite: DES 110.

ARC 210 Design Studio I

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

The  studio  explores  and  develops  conceptual  strategies  for  basic  formal  and  spatial  design,  emphasizing  the  role  of ordering principles and of fundamental architectonic elements in the implementation of design intentions. Students also will be introduced to foundational processes for developing design projects through the application of formal analytical vocabulary, diagramming, drawing methods and conventions, and three-dimensional modeling. Prerequisite: ARC 122.

ARC 212 Design Studio II

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The studio focuses on conceptualization and implementation of architectural ideas in response to environment, landscape, site and enclosure, as applied to a specific program and building type. Students will continue to develop the foundational design processes introduced in previous studios, and will be introduced to the role of rigorous precedent analysis in the generation of architectural ideas. Prerequisite: ARC 210.

 

ARC 220 Computer Modeling

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course will be an advanced course to develop an awareness and understanding of the role of Building Information Modeling in the student’s ability to study design ideas and present those ideas in the various design disciplines. Emphasis will be on the relationship of computer graphics with the design process. Prerequisite: ARC 120.

ARC 240 Architectural History I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The course will cover formal, theoretical, material, pragmatic and conceptual aspects of architecture, cities and art, examined in relation to their cultural contexts, from pre-history to circa 1400.

ARC 242 Architectural History II

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course will cover formal, theoretical, material, pragmatic and conceptual aspects of architecture, cities and art, examined in relation to their cultural contexts, from circa 1400 to the present. Prerequisite: ARC 240.

ARC 280 Materials and Methods

Units: 4. Offered: Spring.

Introduction to materials and methods of the construction of buildings emphasizing the integration of design and technology.  Includes comprehensive introduction to the construction of buildings and their systems, materials and methods, and their implications on building sustainability and design decision-making. Common construction methods and details are introduced. Material applications in structural and non-structural building components are explored. CAD and BIM systems are used to develop construction documents for a case study building. Skills developed include analysis of  building  form  and  function,  understanding  design and material selection interrelationships, and communication of ideas through drawing.

MAT 145 Mathematical Methods in the Natural Sciences

Units: 4. Offered: Spring.

A calculus-based course including an introduction to derivatives and integrals, dimensional analysis, analytical geometry, trigonometry, vectors, experimental error and other topics to provide a mathematical foundation for natural science majors. Prerequisite: MAT 115, 135 or sufficient SAT, ACT or math placement exam scores and appropriate high school mathematics background.

PHY 115 Physics for Architects

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

A study of mathematical methods of physics, kinematics, forces, Newton’s Laws, earthquakes, fluids, work, energy, power, momentum, heat and thermodynamics, electricity, waves, light, and sound. This class will be taught in an “Inquiry- Based” manner. Lecture and lab are integrated. Additional lab fee. Prerequisites: MAT 135, 145, or 245.

Upper Division Requirements

ARC 310 Design Studio III

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

The studio focuses on conceptualization and implementation of architectural ideas throughout the  process of pre-design, programmatic development, site design, and building design. Emphasis will be placed on architectural design as an interpretation and accommodation of various human activities through the exploration of program, perception, scale, proportion, life- safety code and accessibility requirements. Students will continue to develop the design processes introduced in previous studios. Prerequisite: ARC 212.

ARC 312 Design Studio IV

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The studio draws upon the three previous courses in the studio sequence, emphasizing the integrative nature of architectural design. Students will develop and demonstrate their abilities to conceptualize and implement building designs that bring together basic design principles, structural and envelope systems, environmental systems, programmatic and building service systems and egress, through the design of housing. Prerequisite: ARC 310.

ARC 370 Professional Preparation

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

Professional Preparation provides an introduction to the profession of architecture through an 1) exploration of the structures of practice including how an office functions and expectations of internship experience;  2)  exploration of a critical position of the student in relationship to their design work resulting in the craft of portfolio production; 3) development of professional skills and documents required to obtain a job in professional  practice setting; and 4) examination of leadership skills as applied within an architectural practice setting. Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean.

ARC 380 Thermal and Environmental Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course deals with the thermal and environmental processes which effect buildings and how the designer responds to or manipulates the thermal environment. It is necessary for the architect to understand those  processes, the human response to them and the impact of them. The class will be organized around the why, what and how of these issues and processes. Prerequisite: PHY 115.

ARC 385 Luminous and Sonic Environmental Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course deals with those building elements that pertain to the visual and aural conditioning for the purposes of human use and comfort. The basic principles of light (natural and electrical) and acoustical systems, their integration with other building systems and the impact on the aesthetics of design will be stressed. Plumbing and electrical systems also will be presented. The sustainability of various systems will be explored.

ARC 393 Structural Systems I

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

Introductory course in statics and strengths of materials for architects.  The course provides both qualitative understanding and quantitative understanding, but places a specific focus on the conceptual relationships between structure and form.  Topics include static systems, tension / compression, bending and shear stress, combined stresses, strain, cross-sectional considerations, and the physical behavior of structural materials  and systems. Additionally, this course integrates the above material with design studio processes via course projects and course format. Prerequisite: MAT 145 or 245.

ARC 410 Design Studio V

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

This course is an advanced design studio that assumes a high level of proficiency in design process and representation, as well as in other content areas developed in previous studios. This studio focuses on the conceptualization and implementation of comprehensive architectural design.  Students will be expected to draw upon all previous coursework in order to thoroughly develop a project from a detailed program. Emphasis will be placed on the elaboration of architectural ideas through integration and syntheses of structural, environmental, envelope, building assemblies, life-safety systems and the principles of sustainability. Prerequisite: ARC 312. Pre- or Co- Requisites: ARC 480 and 493.

ARC 480 Advanced Sustainable Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course will explore the history, goals, methods of design, quantification, and holistic integration of sustainable systems in architecture. Specific topics include design strategies for energy reduction, passive heating and cooling, comparative energy  modeling, photovoltaic systems, envelope design, life cycle analysis, and sustainable vernacular architecture. Through readings, lectures, research, and projects, students will develop the theoretical framework and technical skills to implement fundamental sustainable strategies in architectural design and to evaluate their impact. Prerequisite: ARC 380.

ARC 493 Structural Systems II

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

Introduction to and application of a systems approach of structural design and analysis of buildings for architects. Topics include considerations of steel, concrete, timber, and long-spans structures.  Introduction to structural analysis including introduction to typical structural analysis computer programs.  Integration of course material with design studio processes via course projects and course format. Prerequisite: ARC 393.

ENT 357 Small Business Management

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This is a practice-oriented course covering major facets of small business with special focus on starting, financing, marketing, operating, and leading the people in a small business. Special emphasis is given to entrepreneurship and small business development.

Upper Division Electives

Complete six (6) units from the following:

DES 310 Design Thought Practicum

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

Design Thought Practicum builds on and continues the process of understanding interdisciplinary design thinking.  The aim of the course is for students to apply the principles and processes of design thinking to the act of design. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to complete design exercises and projects.  Topics include developing a larger framework for design, design methods, design process, human factors in design, and environmental factors. Prerequisite: DES 110.

ARC 350 Architectural Theory I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand the formation and context of various architectural ideas. This course on architectural theory provides students with a means to propose and navigate architectural discourse as a part of their development as architects. Prerequisite: ARC 242.

ARC 400 Special Topics in Architecture

Units: 1-3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will focus on various studio and lecture courses, which explore and present selected topics in architecture and design. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.

ARC 412 Design Studio VI

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The studio is an advanced design studio that promotes the critical, creative and innovative exploration of environmental, human and tectonic factors associated architectural design process and design thinking. Additional focus will be on understanding the theoretical and applied research methodologies and practices used during the design process. Prerequisite: ARC 410.

ARC 460 International Design Seminar

Units: 3. Offered: Summer.

The course offers students an opportunity to learn, discuss, and analyze historical and contemporary architecture theory, criticism, and design principles on location. Raises and addresses architectural questions of composition, society, politics, and environment. Offered only abroad. Prerequisite: Junior status.

ARC 462 International History / Theory Seminar

Units: 3. Offered: Summer.

The course covers the detailed history of architecture and urban development in the host city, from its founding to the present. Offered only abroad. Prerequisite: Junior status.

Student Learning Outcomes

M.Arch Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)

  1. Employ critical thinking skills
  2. Demonstrate facility with a wide range of communication skills
  3. Research and analyze multiple theoretical, social, political, economic, cultural and environmental contexts
  4. Demonstrate overall design sensibilities and problem solving skills
  5. Comprehend building technology, including technical aspects of design, systems and materials, and be able to apply that comprehension to their services
  6. Appreciate the role of professional practice, including their role in the implementation of design decisions and the impact of such decisions on the environment
  7. Integrate their Christian worldview and their profession through service to their community, and through learning to manage, advocate, and act legally, ethically, and critically for the good of the client, society and the public
CURRICULUM PATH

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Master of Architecture (M.Arch)

The Master of Architecture degree is intended to prepare students to become practicing, licensed architects in the United States of America.

California Baptist University, College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design was granted candidacy for the Masters in Architecture professional degree program by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB).  Please refer to the Accreditation tab for further information.

General Education Courses

The general education requirements will follow the curriculum set forth for other university programs. Some general education requirements will be met through specific architecture major requirements.

Lower Division Requirements

DES 110 Design Thought Foundations I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will be an introduction to 2D design thinking, as applied to the interrelated, interdisciplinary fields of design and as understood from a biblical world-view. Basic design theories, principles, major movements and works will be covered. Basic creative approaches and design expressions are explored through projects, class discussions, field trips and lectures. This course is an introduction to the design paths available through the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, but also serves non-design majors interested in discovering design.

ARC 120 Design Communications

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The course will establish a base of design concepts and knowledge with an introduction to references and ideas to foster independent inquiry. The course will develop foundational appreciation and skills for effective two dimensional visual expression through graphic representation.

ARC 122 Design Communications

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The course will establish a base of design concepts and knowledge with an introduction to references and ideas to foster independent  inquiry. The course  will develop foundational appreciation and skills for effective three-dimensional (3D) visual expression through graphic representation. Prerequisite: ARC 120. Pre- or Co- Requisite: DES 110.

ARC 210 Design Studio I

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

The  studio  explores  and  develops  conceptual  strategies  for  basic  formal  and  spatial  design,  emphasizing  the  role  of ordering principles and of fundamental architectonic elements in the implementation of design intentions. Students also will be introduced to foundational processes for developing design projects through the application of formal analytical vocabulary, diagramming, drawing methods and conventions, and three-dimensional modeling. Prerequisite: ARC 122.

ARC 212 Design Studio II

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The studio focuses on conceptualization and implementation of architectural ideas in response to environment, landscape, site and enclosure, as applied to a specific program and building type. Students will continue to develop the foundational design processes introduced in previous studios, and will be introduced to the role of rigorous precedent analysis in the generation of architectural ideas. Prerequisite: ARC 210.

 

ARC 220 Computer Modeling

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course will be an advanced course to develop an awareness and understanding of the role of Building Information Modeling in the student’s ability to study design ideas and present those ideas in the various design disciplines. Emphasis will be on the relationship of computer graphics with the design process. Prerequisite: ARC 120.

ARC 240 Architectural History I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The course will cover formal, theoretical, material, pragmatic and conceptual aspects of architecture, cities and art, examined in relation to their cultural contexts, from pre-history to circa 1400.

ARC 242 Architectural History II

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course will cover formal, theoretical, material, pragmatic and conceptual aspects of architecture, cities and art, examined in relation to their cultural contexts, from circa 1400 to the present. Prerequisite: ARC 240.

ARC 280 Materials and Methods

Units: 4. Offered: Spring.

Introduction to materials and methods of the construction of buildings emphasizing the integration of design and technology.  Includes comprehensive introduction to the construction of buildings and their systems, materials and methods, and their implications on building sustainability and design decision-making. Common construction methods and details are introduced. Material applications in structural and non-structural building components are explored. CAD and BIM systems are used to develop construction documents for a case study building. Skills developed include analysis of  building  form  and  function,  understanding  design and material selection interrelationships, and communication of ideas through drawing.

MAT 145 Mathematical Methods in the Natural Sciences

Units: 4. Offered: Spring.

A calculus-based course including an introduction to derivatives and integrals, dimensional analysis, analytical geometry, trigonometry, vectors, experimental error and other topics to provide a mathematical foundation for natural science majors. Prerequisite: MAT 115, 135 or sufficient SAT, ACT or math placement exam scores and appropriate high school mathematics background.

PHY 115 Physics for Architects

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

A study of mathematical methods of physics, kinematics, forces, Newton’s Laws, earthquakes, fluids, work, energy, power, momentum, heat and thermodynamics, electricity, waves, light, and sound. This class will be taught in an “Inquiry- Based” manner. Lecture and lab are integrated. Additional lab fee. Prerequisites: MAT 135, 145, or 245.

Upper Division Requirements

DES 310 Design Thought Practicum

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

Design Thought Practicum builds on and continues the process of understanding interdisciplinary design thinking.  The aim of the course is for students to apply the principles and processes of design thinking to the act of design. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to complete design exercises and projects.  Topics include developing a larger framework for design, design methods, design process, human factors in design, and environmental factors. Prerequisite: DES 110.

ARC 310 Design Studio III

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

The studio focuses on conceptualization and implementation of architectural ideas throughout the  process of pre-design, programmatic development, site design, and building design. Emphasis will be placed on architectural design as an interpretation and accommodation of various human activities through the exploration of program, perception, scale, proportion, life- safety code and accessibility requirements. Students will continue to develop the design processes introduced in previous studios. Prerequisite: ARC 212.

ARC 312 Design Studio IV

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The studio draws upon the three previous courses in the studio sequence, emphasizing the integrative nature of architectural design. Students will develop and demonstrate their abilities to conceptualize and implement building designs that bring together basic design principles, structural and envelope systems, environmental systems, programmatic and building service systems and egress, through the design of housing. Prerequisite: ARC 310.

ARC 350 Architectural Theory I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand the formation and context of various architectural ideas. This course on architectural theory provides students with a means to propose and navigate architectural discourse as a part of their development as architects. Prerequisite: ARC 242.

ARC 370 Professional Preparation

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

Professional Preparation provides an introduction to the profession of architecture through an 1) exploration of the structures of practice including how an office functions and expectations of internship experience;  2)  exploration of a critical position of the student in relationship to their design work resulting in the craft of portfolio production; 3) development of professional skills and documents required to obtain a job in professional  practice setting; and 4) examination of leadership skills as applied within an architectural practice setting. Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean.

ARC 380 Thermal and Environmental Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course deals with the thermal and environmental processes which effect buildings and how the designer responds to or manipulates the thermal environment. It is necessary for the architect to understand those  processes, the human response to them and the impact of them. The class will be organized around the why, what and how of these issues and processes. Prerequisite: PHY 115.

ARC 385 Luminous and Sonic Environmental Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course deals with those building elements that pertain to the visual and aural conditioning for the purposes of human use and comfort. The basic principles of light (natural and electrical) and acoustical systems, their integration with other building systems and the impact on the aesthetics of design will be stressed. Plumbing and electrical systems also will be presented. The sustainability of various systems will be explored.

ARC 393 Structural Systems I

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

Introductory course in statics and strengths of materials for architects.  The course provides both qualitative understanding and quantitative understanding, but places a specific focus on the conceptual relationships between structure and form.  Topics include static systems, tension / compression, bending and shear stress, combined stresses, strain, cross-sectional considerations, and the physical behavior of structural materials  and systems. Additionally, this course integrates the above material with design studio processes via course projects and course format. Prerequisite: MAT 145 or 245.

ARC 400 Special Topics in Architecture

Units: 1-3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will focus on various studio and lecture courses, which explore and present selected topics in architecture and design. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.

ARC 410 Design Studio V

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

This course is an advanced design studio that assumes a high level of proficiency in design process and representation, as well as in other content areas developed in previous studios. This studio focuses on the conceptualization and implementation of comprehensive architectural design.  Students will be expected to draw upon all previous coursework in order to thoroughly develop a project from a detailed program. Emphasis will be placed on the elaboration of architectural ideas through integration and syntheses of structural, environmental, envelope, building assemblies, life-safety systems and the principles of sustainability. Prerequisite: ARC 312. Pre- or Co- Requisites: ARC 480 and 493.

ARC 412 Design Studio VI

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

The studio is an advanced design studio that promotes the critical, creative and innovative exploration of environmental, human and tectonic factors associated architectural design process and design thinking. Additional focus will be on understanding the theoretical and applied research methodologies and practices used during the design process. Prerequisite: ARC 410.

ARC 460 International Design Seminar

Units: 3. Offered: Summer.

The course offers students an opportunity to learn, discuss, and analyze historical and contemporary architecture theory, criticism, and design principles on location. Raises and addresses architectural questions of composition, society, politics, and environment. Offered only abroad. Prerequisite: Junior status.

ARC 462 International History / Theory Seminar

Units: 3. Offered: Summer.

The course covers the detailed history of architecture and urban development in the host city, from its founding to the present. Offered only abroad. Prerequisite: Junior status.

ARC 480 Advanced Sustainable Systems

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course will explore the history, goals, methods of design, quantification, and holistic integration of sustainable systems in architecture. Specific topics include design strategies for energy reduction, passive heating and cooling, comparative energy  modeling, photovoltaic systems, envelope design, life cycle analysis, and sustainable vernacular architecture. Through readings, lectures, research, and projects, students will develop the theoretical framework and technical skills to implement fundamental sustainable strategies in architectural design and to evaluate their impact. Prerequisite: ARC 380.

ARC 491 Architecture Internship

Units: 1-3. Offered: As offered.

The purpose of this course is to expose students to the profession of architecture in a professional office setting, familiarize students with a professional working environment, prepare students for future employment and allow students to start their AXP process. Prerequisite: ARC 370.

ARC 493 Structural Systems II

Units: 4. Offered: Fall.

Introduction to and application of a systems approach of structural design and analysis of buildings for architects. Topics include considerations of steel, concrete, timber, and long-spans structures.  Introduction to structural analysis including introduction to typical structural analysis computer programs.  Integration of course material with design studio processes via course projects and course format. Prerequisite: ARC 393.

ENT 357 Small Business Management

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This is a practice-oriented course covering major facets of small business with special focus on starting, financing, marketing, operating, and leading the people in a small business. Special emphasis is given to entrepreneurship and small business development.

Graduate Level Requirements

ARC 510 Design Studio VII

Units: 6. Offered: Fall.

The master level course is an advanced design studio that assumes a high level of proficiency in design process and representation, as well as in other content areas developed in the pre-professional program. The studio promotes the critical, creative and innovative exploration of environmental, human and tectonic factors associated with architectural design. Prerequisites: ARC 412 and Master of Architecture student.

ARC 511 Thesis Research and Preparation

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

The thesis option is comprised of two components: a three-credit-hour seminar in the fall term and a six-credit-hour thesis studio in the spring term. The course takes the form of a seminar plus individual tutorials. Each thesis student selects a faculty thesis advisor to work with throughout the year, as well as an outside consultant – a specialist with knowledge of the particular subject matter of the thesis. The prospective thesis student must present a statement of intent along with portfolio examples to a thesis committee for review and acceptance into the thesis studio. Prerequisite: ARC 412 and Masters of Architecture student.

ARC 512 Thesis Studio

Units: 6. Offered: Spring.

Capstone of the studio sequence providing a setting for the exploration and synthesis of specific in-depth topics of personal and professional importance to the individual student that were developed in the thesis preparation course. Prerequisites: ARC 510, 511, and Masters of Architecture student..

ARC 570 Professional Practice

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

Advanced seminar that addresses laws and regulation, project process and economics, business practices and management and ethical concerns. Students will critically explore how daily operations of architectural practice are an expression of personal values. Prerequisite: Masters of Architecture student.

BUS 506 Entrepreneurship Management

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

This course introduces new enterprise creation and management from the perspective of the entrepreneur. Some practical issues that are covered in detail include: market planning, business plan preparation, the opportunity recognition process, and startup capital acquisition. The course will cover social entrepreneurship as well as corporate entrepreneurship. Students may only earn credit for either BUS 505 or BUS 506.

Graduate Level Electives

Complete nine (9) units from the following:

ARC 500 Special Topics in Architecture

Units: 1-3. Offered: As offered.

The course will focus on various studio and lecture courses, which explore and present selected topics in architecture and design. May be repeated for credit with change in topic for a maximum of six (6) units. Example of course offered: Theology of the Built Environment.  Prerequisite: Masters of Architecture student.

ARC 531 History of Landscape Architecture

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

This broad-ranging course is an introduction to the idea of landscape as cultural phenomenon and the role of the term landscape as a representation of how society views the built world. Prerequisite: Masters of Architecture student.

ARC 532 Landscape Interventions

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

This seminar critically examines vernacular architecture and the vernacular process on a global scale. The course is organized into two parts. The first set of readings will define vernacular architecture and introduce current historical methodologies for analyzing vernacular sites. The second set of readings introduces a wide variety of examples from the cave homes of central China, to the stilt houses of Dahomey, to the housebarns of Europe and North American, to the wind towers of Iran and the ornamental cottages of Russia. Prerequisite: Masters of Architecture student.

ARC 535 Modern Architecture

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

This course examines various topics in modern and contemporary Western architecture from roughly 1900 to the present, including major architects, monuments, and stylistic and theoretical movements. We will discuss the history of modern architecture in relation to other artistic media such as painting, sculpture, photography, and film, as well as in relation to technological, cultural, and socioeconomic issues. Prerequisite: Masters of Architecture student.

ARC 536 Architecture of Cities

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

The seminar is designed as a critical and collective inquiry into theories of urban design in order to develop an in-depth, interdisciplinary approach toward a more meaningful urban design for the future. Prerequisite: Masters of Architecture student.

ARC 560 Directed Design Research

Units: 1-3. Offered: As offered.

Independent design exploration in architecture. Students are required to identify and explore transcendent issues and principles through the discipline of architectural design. May be repeated for credit with change in topic for a maximum of six (6) units. Prerequisite: Masters of Architecture student.

Student Learning Outcomes

M.Arch Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)

  1. Employ critical thinking skills
  2. Demonstrate facility with a wide range of communication skills
  3. Research and analyze multiple theoretical, social, political, economic, cultural and environmental contexts
  4. Demonstrate overall design sensibilities and problem solving skills
  5. Comprehend building technology, including technical aspects of design, systems and materials, and be able to apply that comprehension to their services
  6. Appreciate the role of professional practice, including their role in the implementation of design decisions and the impact of such decisions on the environment
  7. Integrate their Christian worldview and their profession through service to their community, and through learning to manage, advocate, and act legally, ethically, and critically for the good of the client, society and the public
CURRICULUM PATH

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Optional Graduate (M.Arch) Concentrations

CBU Architecture offers four optional concentrations, allowing students to specialize and distinguish themselves as architects who demonstrate professional excellence and personal integrity, are servant leaders in their communities and who live biblically-based, missional lives within the profession.

Optional graduate concentrations require twelve (12) additional units of upper level coursework from a specific set of courses as listed below.

Religion & the Built Environment

The Religion & the Built Environment Concentration intends to prepare students to become leaders, consultants, and successful architects of religious structures across a variety of socioeconomic and geographic settings; from mega-churches in the United States to structures for church planters across the globe.  In addition to this concentration, students have the ability to engage with the Church Design Research Institute within the Architecture department, earning AXP intern credit.

Complete twelve (12) units from the following:

ANT 460 Religion and Culture

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

An overview of religion and its relationship to worldview, faith and practice. This course examines how religious beliefs affect all other aspects of culture and the impact of religion in a cross cultural or multi-cultural context.

CBS403 Congregation & Community

Units: Fall. Offered: 3.

An overview of Christian congregation and community from theological and behavioral science perspectives. Subjects include
the  function  and  purpose  of  Christian  Institutions  including  the household  and  congregation  as  a  place  of  discipleship,  worship, fellowship and relational reconciliation. Secondary institutions will include Christian media, economics, law and education. The impact of the shift from Christian nationalism to post-Christian America will be addressed.

CST 360 Church History

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

A survey of the development of the Christian church from the close of the New Testament period to the present time, with special attention to the origin of various denominations. Core requirement for Christian Studies majors and minors.

PSY 459 Dynamics of Religious Experience

Units: 3. Offered: Fall (odd years).

An examination of the social psychological significance of religious experiences and practices viewed from their personal, cultural, and institutional aspects. Prerequisite: PSY 213

SOC 349 Sociology of Religion

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (even years).

This  course  examines  and  applies  social  science  theories  and  perspectives  to  understanding  the  human  and  social  construction of religion, including the examination of how religious groups are organized, their cultural settings, political and  economic  correlates,  and  capabilities  as  agents  of  social  change.  In  addition,  the  course  explores  the  intersection  between the secular social construct of religion, the cultural-Christian expression of religion, and the biblical model of kinship relations and community.

Construction Management

The Construction Management Concentration leverages the resources and skills of CBU’s Construction Management department in order to allow architecture students to broaden their awareness and knowledge of construction management practices.  With this concentration, students will prepare themselves to take on construction coordination and supervision roles in an architectural office, design-build firm, or construction management company.

Complete twelve (12) units from the following:

CON 460 Construction Planning and Scheduling

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

Construction Planning and Scheduling introduces students to theory and application of construction scheduling to control the acquisition, movement, storage, utilization of workers, material, and equipment with emphasis given to the Critical Path Method (CPM). Prerequisites: CON 330 and 430.

CON 330 Construction Safety

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

Introduces students to the various causes of construction accidents and adopted strategies to prevent work site injuries and illnesses with an emphasis on OSHA standards.

CON 350 Project Delivery, Law and Contracts

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course covers construction ethics and introduces students to the various aspects of construction contracts and documentation procedures.

CON 430 Advanced Estimating

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

Advanced Estimating relates to construction project cost from the conceptual phase to full implementation. The course canvases the entire estimating sequence and introduce students to computer estimating software. Prerequisite: CON 205 and Senior status.

EGR 541 Project & Construction Management

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

An introduction to professional construction management practice including contracts, addendums, bonds, design-build,bids, specifications, scheduling, and other legal issues. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status.

Architectural Representation

The Architectural Representation Concentration augments as student’s architectural curriculum with a series of graphic design and representation courses taught within CAVAD’s design departments.  This concentration will prepare students to be high valued interns from day one by equipping them with strategic representation skills that can be utilized in the preparation of architectural presentations, marketing materials, or rendering services.

Complete twelve (12) units from the following:

GDM 130 Fundamental Image

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course explores the tools and implementations of Adobe Photoshop through assigned projects and exercises. Techniques will be explored and explained. Best practice work-flows will be taught. The goal of this course is a working knowledge of Photoshop for the student.

GDM 321 The Art and Design of Professional Presentations

Units: 3. Offered: Online and Professional Studies.

This course introduces students to the knowledge and skills necessary to develop professional interactive multimedia productions. Classroom activities include how to identify the design and communication issues from pre through post production of an interactive presentation. In this multimedia design and production course, students integrate research, writing, creative visual layout, and interface design to develop high impact professional presentations. Additionally, students will learn how to define and identify project goals, purpose, audience, timeline milestones, budget constraints and other multimedia project parameters.

GDM 330 Intermediate Image

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course is an intermediate image course in which more complex photography and photoshop techniques will be taught. Students will learn how to manipulate photography using photoshop to create complex ideas and messages. Prerequisite: GDM 130.

GDM 430 Advanced Image

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course is an advanced image course in which professional, complex image generation is explored and expert techniques in color correction, masking and compositing are implemented. Professional portfolio projects are built to prepare students for employment or advanced studies. Prerequisite: GDM 330.

PHO 432 On Location Photography

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course will challenge the photography student to tell stories outside the controlled environment and to successfully navigate lighting and viewpoint obstacles. Prerequisite: GDM 330.

Human Factors in Design

The Human Factors in Design Concentration takes CBU’s dedication to serving humanity and the community to the next level.  This concentration asks students to take the insights and research approaches of sociologists, psychologists, or anthropologists and apply them to an architectural design setting.  Students with this concentration become valuable assets to any design programming phase, design process, of design research imitative.

Complete twelve (12) units from the following:

ANT 325 Physical Anthropology and Archeology

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

A general survey of Physical Anthropology, including evolutionary theory, the primate fossil record, primatology, human variability, and genetics. The history, methods, and theories of archaeology are also considered – covering all eras of the human past, from prehistoric to modern times.

ANT 340 Theory in Anthropology

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

An overview and examination of anthropological theory in historic context. This addresses theory of Culture as the main focus but includes Archeological theory and perspectives from Physical and Linguistic anthropology. Prerequisite: ANT 225 or BEH 100.

ANT 410 Economic and Political Anthropology

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course will examine patterns of subsistence (economics) and social organization and control. Focusing on case studies and theoretical perspectives in anthropology regarding economics and political systems, students will explore the meaning and function of various approaches to subsistence and social organization. Using the comparative perspective (ethnology), students will also critically assess democracy as it is contextualized among various people groups to consider various forms of political engagement and shape their own views of how cultural groups employ these patterns of culture.

ANT 430 Culture and Personality

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course focuses on the interaction  between personal patterns of behavior and social influences, paying particular attention to media influence and a history of social and psychological perspectives. Students will consider the dynamic between environment and heredity (nature/nurture) as they explore several facets of human behavior. Prerequisite: ANT 225 or BEH 100.

PSY 305 Developmental Psychology: Child

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course examines the principles of psychological, cognitive, physical, spiritual and social development from conception to  adolescence.  A  Biblical  view  of  growth  and  change  throughout  these  developmental  periods  will  be  addressed.  Prerequisite: PSY 213.

PSY 315 Developmental Psychology: Adolescence and Adulthood

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This  course  examines  the  principles  of  psychological,  cognitive,  physical,  spiritual  and  social  development  from  late  childhood  to  late  adulthood.  A  Biblical  view  of  growth  and  change  throughout  these  developmental  periods  will  be  addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 213

PSY 328 Cognitive Psychology

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course provides an introduction into the structure and functions of the mind from the viewpoint of computation, neuroscience, and philosophy. Students will examine the historical significance of this subject, how the field has changed over time, and the current important issues of thought and memory. Topics include attention processing, memory, mental imagery,  decision  making  process,  consciousness,  creativity,  and  methods  for  measuring  nformational  processing.  Prerequisite: PSY 213.

PSY 338 Sensation & Perception

Units: 3. Offered: Fall (even years).

A  general  introduction  to  the  scientific  study  of  sensory  processes  and  perceptual  phenomena.  This  course  focuses  on
the link between the brain and sensory structures of human physiology and the mind with its memory, interpretive and linguistic aspects of personal and shared meaning. Prerequisite: PSY 213

PSY 458 Motivation & Emotion

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (odd years).

An introduction to both theoretical and physiological aspects of emotion and motivation in humans. Topics will include the biological correlates of emotion and motivation, psychological influences, and social factors. Emphasis is on methods for studying motivation and emotion and their role in human behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 213.

SOC 335 Social Problems

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

A study of the nature and meaning of social problems and deviant behavior in American Society.  The incidence and characteristics of selected social problems of major public interest will be explored. Prerequisite: BEH 100 or SOC 213.

SOC 338 Group Dynamics and Social Movements

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

The course addresses the sociological and social psychology dimensions of group behavior, the influences on the socialization of the individual, social interaction and impacts on patterned roles and authority structures. Theories will be applied in group experiences, observations, writing, and problem solving. Prerequisite: SOC 213.

SOC 348 Sociology of Aging

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course will critically look at aging as a social process in addition to its biological and psychological components. Additionally, it will identify the aging population in our present society, the various social experiences associated with aging as well as the socioeconomic issues related to aging.

SOC 355 Social Stratification

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course explores the development, patterns, structures, and consequences of social inequality, with emphasis on social progress, how American institutions are affected, and how social interactions react to institutionalized inequality. Dynamics of resistance and social change are also discussed. Prerequisite BEH 100 or SOC 213.

Launch your Architecture Career

The path to becoming a licensed architect is a multi-step process that includes Education, Experience, and Examination.  CBU Architecture is distinct in its combination of offering a 5-year Master of Architecture program which is rooted in a Christian worldview and missional community engagement.  With this combination, CBU students are able to complete their education requirement in a shorter time, all while potentially earning a portion of their experience credit for their community engagement involvement during their time at CBU.

For more information on the path to licensure see: www.ncarb.org.

Path to Architecture Licensure

Prepare Yourself for a Growing Job Market

Seasonally adjusted Construction Spending 2010 – Q3 2016
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Credit: AIA Forsight Report 2017

Increased Construction

Since 2008 the construction industry, and in parallel demand for architectural services has steadily increased.  Both total construction and private non-residential construction are on an increasing trend.  Total construction spending in 2016 has returned to 2006 levels, and private non-residential spending has returned to 2008 levels.

Optimism of Leaders

“In a recent DesignIntellegence survey, 63% of A/E/C firm leaders surveyed felt that the U.S. market would be positive for architecture, design, engineering, and construction businesses in the upcoming 10 years.” – AIA Foresight Report 2017.  Of the remaining 37% of design leaders surveyed, only 3% had a negative outlook.

(Right Graph Source: AIA Foresight Report 2017)

Aging of Current Architects

According to American Institute of Architects membership data, 60% of architects are 45 years of age or older.  “Current statistics stand in contrast to 1991, for example, when 26% of architects where under 35, and 40% were 36-44” – AIA Foresight Report 2017.  In short, there is an increasing need for new young architects in America to replace the aging, and soon retiring, population of architects.

(Left Graph Source: AIA Foresight Report 2017)

“…of all majors…Architecture was the most likely to have a job secured before they graduated from college.”
USA Today, College Study 2017

Student Work

Faculty

Student Engagement

At CBU Architecture, we aim to develop architects who demonstrate professional excellence and personal integrity, are servant leaders in their communities and who live biblically-based, missional lives within the profession.  While this is a regular topic of discussion during class, we also aim to provide key opportunities for our students outside the class to engage with the profession, apply their skill sets in a missional setting, and participate in developing industry leading research.

CBU AIAS

American Institute of Architecture Students chapter at CBU is active at the local, regional, and national level. CBU AIAS provides opportunities for students to engage with the profession of architecture through hosted lectures, workshops, firm tours, and networking events.  Additionally, CBU AIAS is directly associated with the AIA chapter of the Inland Empire as well as other student AIAS chapters.  To learn more, visit the CBU AIAS website.

CRUX is a non-profit design studio that serves missional efforts around the globe via design, planning, research, and presentation services.  The studio leadership is coordinated effort between CBU architecture faculty and missionary architects around the globe.  CBU Architecture students have the opportunity to participate in CRUX, work on real projects, and serve the world.

Association of Christians in Architecture

CBU ACA chapter works to create opportunities for students to integrate the Christian worldview and architecture outside their courses.  CBU ACA hosts a weekly Architecture Bible Study, organizes peer mentoring in the department of architecture, provides professional Christian networking opportunities, and initiates Christian worldview discussions within the study body.

Church Design Research Institute

Church Design Research Institute is a non-profit research and design studio dedicated to providing church design research insights to the American church.  Students are able to participate in the institute as Design Interns or Research Interns and earn AXP Intern credit through NCARB.  To learn more visit churchdesignresearch.org.

CBU NOMAS

CBU’s chapter of National Organization of Minority Students works to provide professional networking and professional development activities for all students.  CBU NOMAS organizes activities that include firm visits, critical issue lectures, professional networking events, and organizes local minority practitioner guest reviewers.

CBU Freedom by Design

CBU Architecture Freedom by Design chapter serves as the community service wing of the AIAS.  Freedom by Design, in partnership with the National Council of Architectural Registration Board (NCARB) uses the talents of architecture students to radically impact the lives of people in their community through modest design and construction solutions. By leveraging design-build projects, CBU’s Freedom by Design chapter seeks to help lower physical, educational, environmental, socio-economic, and cultural barriers in the local community.

International Service Projects

CBU is committed to fulfilling Jesus’ mandate in the Great Commission “to go and make disciples of all nations.” To this end, CBU believes that God bestows upon every student gifts and passions to accomplish their purpose. To that end, CBU sends out more students worldwide than any other college in the country.  For more information see the Office of Mobilization.

International Study Trip

Intentional Study Built into the Program

The CBU Architecture program holds real-world experience as an essential part of a good education.  As part of the CBU Architecture Program, students participate in a 5 week international trip – at no additional cost. During the trip the students will earn six units of course credit that covers topics of Design and Urbanism to History and Theory.

Florence, Venice, Rome & Beyond

5 weeks in Italy; apartments in Florence and Rome; guided tours from informed faculty; sketching architectural masterpieces; great food.  The CBU International Study trip to Italy (ISTI) embeds students into the Italian culture, and through a careful study of design, history, and urban design, asks students to consider deeply the foundational truths of the profession.

Studio Culture Policy

1. The Policy

The Studios Culture of CBU Architecture will value generosity of spirit, open discourse, continuous testing of ideas and a commitment to excellence on the part of all the participants. It will promote a culture of engagement in which students develop intellectually, technically, ethically and spiritually through interaction with problems, opportunities and people not only within the field of architecture, but beyond it.

2. Process of Implementation and Maintenance

The members of the CBU Architecture community agree to uphold the Studio Culture Policy. The policy will be a working guide for Studio Culture at CBU. The Policy will be introduced to students at the Academic School Orientations, posted in the studios themselves, available on the CAVAD website and included in the Student Undergraduate Catalog.

A team of faculty and students will review the policy annually, determine its efficacy and ensure its implementation. Revisions to the current policy will be discussed by the team with the common goal of maintaining a healthy studio environment that supports holistic growth through the sharing of knowledge, ideas and experiences.

3. Studio Design

Studio is the central component of an effective education in architecture. Studio learning encourages dialogue, collaboration, risk-taking, innovation, and a “learn-by-doing” pedagogy. The Studio atmosphere is a unique learning community that fosters increased scholarship as well as personal connectedness and an attitude of “iron sharpening iron.”

4. Faculty

Students are encouraged to think of all the faculty of CBU Architecture as “their” faculty, not just their particular Studio instructor. Interaction between students in separate studios and between students in separate years of the program is encouraged, as is interaction between students in the separate disciplines of CAVAD.

5. Time Management

Students and faculty must lead balanced lives and use time wisely, including time outside the Design Studio, to gain from all aspects of a university education and life experiences. Although we believe in the Studio as the backbone of the architectural education, we also believe in the value of a rich, fully engaged life that is deeply involved in spiritual maturity and service.

6. Interdisciplinary and Collaborative Opportunities

We believe that Design is the integration of many parts, that process is as important as product, and that the act of design and of professional practice is inherently interdisciplinary, requiring active and respectful collaboration with others.

The CBU Architecture program is built on a foundation of interdisciplinary learning, and opportunities to promote and experience this philosophy are inherent throughout the program. We seek every opportunity for collaborative processes and learning opportunities, not only within the program, but across the disciplines of CAVAD, CBU and the larger community outside of our walls. We will highly value cross-disciplinary design studios and design-build project opportunities that span disciplines and reach into our community. This is in keeping with our University Student Outcome to “implement a personal and social ethic that results in informed participation in multiple levels of community.

7. Assessment

Design critique is an integral part of the learning experience. Students will learn from faculty, but also from peers and from the experience itself. Making clear, understandable and comprehensive presentations of one’s ideas, both graphic and verbal, and then learning from the critical feedback that the presentation generates, are vital learning experiences that help prepare students for professional practice. We highly value honesty and forthrightness, in a constructive atmosphere of respect and encouragement.

CBU’s architecture program encourages assessment for design and studio courses that affirms the values of respect for a student’s ideas (intention), the development of these ideas (process), and the ability to make those ideas spatial & material (product). Students will therefore be graded on an understanding of the concepts that motivate and initiate the project at hand (grasp of ideas), the student’s rigor in the development of ideas and use of information in the process of design (work effort), and the material and graphic quality of the project’s final products – be they models, drawings or representations in other media (communication of ideas). Some advanced Studio projects will also consider the appropriateness of the proposed design solution in its real-world context.

8. Diversity

CBU Architecture values social, intellectual and disciplinary diversity, as well as diversity in race, nationality and gender, in its staff, faculty and student population, as well as in its curriculum. We support active, open discourse, and the Studio must be a place where diverse life experiences and opinions are shared. A culture of respect and open inquiry provides the foundation of a life-long learning perspective that begins in architecture school. This attitude is in keeping with our University Student Outcome to “respect diverse religious, cultural, philosophical, and aesthetic experiences and perspectives.” The program is currently recruiting students from high schools representing a wide cross section of Southern California’s ethnic and socio-economic communities. We are also involved in the ongoing recruitment of international students.

* Studio Policy is an evolving draft, which is being regularly assessed, negotiated and ratified with students and faculty.

Architecture Program Accreditation

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the pre- professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The NAAB grants candidacy status to new programs that have developed viable plans for achieving initial accreditation. Candidacy status indicates that a program should be accredited within 6 years of achieving candidacy, if its plan is properly implemented. In order to meet the education requirement set forth by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards, an applicant for an NCARB Certificate must hold a professional degree in architecture from a program accredited by the NAAB; the degree must have been awarded not more than two years prior to initial accreditation. However, meeting the education requirement for the NCARB Certificate may not be equivalent to meeting the education requirement for registration in a specific jurisdiction. Please contact NCARB for more information.

California Baptist University, Architecture Program was granted candidacy for the following professional degree program in architecture:

M.Arch. (168 credits minimum) – 2014.

The projected year of accreditation is 2018.  CBU Architecture’s next visit for accreditation approval is scheduled for Fall 2018.

The latest Architecture Program Report (APR) and NAAB Visiting Team Report (VTR) are available for view in the CAVAD Office at CBU, Room J446, alongside copies of the latest NAAB Conditions for Accreditation, and Procedures for Accreditation, and all other accreditation related documentation.

CBU Architecture Advisory Panel

Keith Crouch, AIA, NCARB

Director of Church Architecture, Baptist General Convention, TX
Dallas, TX

Mr. Crouch is a nationally certified and licensed architect. As a church architecture planning consultant with over 31 years of experience he has conducted over 2,500 individualized building consultations. Mr. Crouch has eight years of prior experience on staff with commercial architectural firms, specializing in religious architecture, healthcare and retirement community design. He is also Director of Church Architecture for the Baptist General Convention of Texas.

Mr. Crouch has been a guest lecturer at Southwestern Theological Seminary, Ft. Worth, and Dallas Baptist University, Dallas, on topics related to religious architecture and  planning. He has also conducted seminars and building consultations throughout Texas and with churches, architects and denominational leaders in the South Carolina  Baptist Convention, the Minnesota/Wisconsin Baptist Convention, Canada, and through the Partnership Missions Program in Germany, Estonia, Hungary, and Romania.

Marco Eacrett, AIA, LEED AP

Managing Principal, PBK
Ontario, CA

Since 1991, Marco has specialized in master planning, programming, design and project management of K-12, higher education, religious, and public works projects in California. As Managing Principal of PBK’s Ontario office, he performs as PBK’s day-to-day service champion and senior client executive in charge of the successful execution of each assigned project.

Bruce Faudrée, AIA, RIBA, NCARB

Director of Architecture, Mason & Hanger
Virginia Beach, VA

Mr. Faudrée, currently serves as the Director of Architecture for Mason & Hanger and is responsible for the supervision, direction, and management of all elements of the  firm’s Architecture Department. Prior to his work at Mason & Hanger, Faudrée, spent the previous decade in service to the United States of America in the U.S. Department of the State Overseas Building Operation. Eventually rising to the Division Chief, Faudrée, supervised, directed, and managed the engineering / architectural project functions of the Near East Asia – South Central Asia Division, during which sixteen embassies and consulates where built throughout the region. Faudrée, has also served with the International Mission Board, SCB in the Pacific Rim Region as the Architect & Construction Projects Coordinator.

Ronald E. Geyer, AIA, NCIDQ

Architect and Principal, Good City Architects
Greenville, SC

Ron Geyer is an architect and interior designer with more than 30 years’ experience serving ministries, businesses and cultural organizations. Along the way, he’s become a master at helping full-time and volunteer leaders spell out the needs and aspirations that drive important projects, rally supporters, and equip churches to reach and serve the community. In the process, he’s produced great buildings that guard resources and speak volumes about what’s going on inside.

Ron has also served as a member of the American Institute of Architects’ five-person advisory group on religion, art and architecture.

John Justus, AIA

Principal / Vice President, HGA Architects & Engineers
Sacramento, CA

As a principal with more than 30 years experience designing cultural and religious architecture, John fosters a collaborative team environment to explore a project’s creative potential. “A building should be a communicator of a client’s needs, express the clients program and function,” he says. His hands-on leadership style results in innovative designs and quality solutions that are cost effective, functional and inspiring. In addition to his work at HGA,

John has also previous served 5 years on the John also served 5 years on the Interfaith Forum on Religion, Art, and Architecture (IFRAA) – AIA Knowledge Community Advisory Board.

Nathan Kim

Firmwide Education Practice Area Leader,
Studio Director, Principal, Gensler
Los Angeles, CA

In his role as a Firmwide Education Practice Area Leader and Principal, Nathan combines more than 15 years of experience with a deep conviction in the power of education and the promise of its global impact. His work includes the California State University system, community colleges, K–12 and charter schools. Nathan fosters a collaborative process that leads to design innovation and technical excellence, and combines creative talent and in-depth practical experience to seamlessly bridge all project phases. Nathan serves as a board member for the Asian American Architects/Engineers Association, the Board of Regents for the Da Vinci Schools, and an Advisory Board member on the California Baptist University School of Architecture. Nathan received his Bachelor of Architecture from California State Polytechnic University at Pomona, and has remained involved in design education as an advisor to the Da Vinci Schools.

Ed Luebben, LEED AP, AIA, NCARB

Senior Architect, Meier Architecture & Engineering
Missionary Architect, Help Ministries
Kennewick, WA

Mr. Luebben has more than 25 years of architectural experience including six years in government and energy related industries and 22 years in private corporate practice. During six of his years in private practice, Ed was involved with setting up and managing a small branch office in Walla Walla, Washington. During the past five years, Ed’s responsibilities have included developing clients, interacting with permitting agencies, assisting contractors during bid and construction phases, and coordinating all consulting relationships.

Since 2011, Ed has served with Help Ministries as a Missionary Architect. Through these efforts, Ed has served numerous ministries such as CAM International, Caribbean Christian Centre for the Deaf, Church Mexico, Dale Kietzman University, HOLD the Children, Mama Tara Orphanage, New Frontiers in Health Force, Portland Rescue Mission, Scott Theological College, Serving in Mission (SIM), True Disciples, and Voices of Hope. In partnership with these organizations, Ed has aided the development and realization of built works in Latin America, Africa, and Asia.

Gary Nicholson, AIA, NCARB, DBIA

Sole Proprietor: Gary Nicholson, Architect
Nashville, TN

Amassing over 40 years of experience in church design, Gary has a long history of helping churches design and build facilities that enhance their ministry and foster  growth. His architecture degree is from the University of Texas at Austin, but he also earned his Master of Divinity Degree at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and served on the staff of several churches in youth and music ministry before entering a full time career in architecture.

He worked with his father as an intern architect, as well as 22 years with LifeWay Christian Resources and Visioneering Studios, serving as the Director of the Architecture Department of the Southern Baptist Convention from 2006 to 2013.

He has been a guest lecturer at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and he has taught in local and national seminars all across the U.S.  He has had many articles and interviews published in various magazines and his book was published by LifeWay in 2010 called Building Momentum – Leading Your Church to Plan and Build Effective Facilities for Ministry, offering practical guidance about almost every aspect of the building process.

With an emphasis on strategic master planning and feasibility, he now serves churches through his own firm, encouraging leaders to use their facilities to enrich and enlarge the Kingdom in fulfillment of the Great Commission.

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