Film

 

Film

See Differently

Film is the most culturally influential artistic medium in our era. The film major equips students both to understand film as a culture-shaping force and to pursue diverse careers in the entertainment industry. In a world that increasingly relies on visual information, a comprehension of how meaning grows out of the moving image is indispensable to a deeper social and cultural understanding.

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CBU Film majors develop valuable technical knowledge and experience as well as sharp critical thinking skills and significant audio-visual literacy. Our majors have the opportunity to learn how to apply this knowledge to filmmaking by creating high quality films on state-of-the-art equipment, writing screenplays and teleplays, and exploring the best of global cinema.

Film Concentrations

CBU Film offers four concentrations, allowing students to specialize and distinguish themselves as film professionals who demonstrate professional excellence and personal integrity, are servant leaders in their communities, and who live Biblically-based, missional lives within the profession.

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Student Work

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“The CBU Film Department is unique in the fact that it is truly hands-on and the class size is small. The professors truly care in helping the students grow spiritually and succeed in the industry” — Rebecca Lam, (Senior, Film)

“The California Baptist University Film Department is a very pleasant environment to learn in. With a lot of hands on experience, students can expect to learn from great professors and very professional equipment.”  — Micah Emerine (Senior, Double Major in Film and Graphic Design)

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Film Minor

Students minoring in Film Studies will complete 21 units of Film coursework, including 9 units (3 classes) of required lower-division foundational courses and 12 units (4 classes) chosen from any Film courses offered, including both  Film Studies (FLM) and Film Production (FLP) courses in any combination (see list below). Also, Film Studies minors may use the program’s filmmaking equipment and Film Lab, featuring all the screenwriting, editing, and other post-production software needed to complete film projects.

Lower Division Requirements

Complete the following lower division courses.  Note: FLP170 – Basic Production: Visual Story Telling must be taken prior to any upper division FLP courses within the Upper Division Requirement.

FLM 105 Introduction to Film Studies

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course offers an introduction to methods and approaches for the study of film. Students will learn film terminology and its effective application in film analysis. Students also will develop, maintain, and improve strategies for close-reading individual shots and sequences, interpreting cinematic narrative and technique, and for negotiating various critical and theoretical paradigms of film study.

FLM 150 Film History

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course studies the development of film history from its beginnings in the late nineteenth century up to the present day. As the growth of cinema has been a global phenomenon, we will look at major films, filmmakers, and film movements in the United States and around the world. Pre- or Co- requisite: ENG 123. Recommended: FLM 105.

FLM 250 Film Theory and Criticism

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course introduces students to the major areas and concepts of film theory and criticism, from their inception in the early twentieth century to the present. It examines how various film theories, as part of a long-standing tradition of critical reflections on life and the arts in general, evolve and interact with one another and with neighboring discourses, nationally and internationally. Knowledge and skills gained in this class will prepare students for further upper-division film courses, in which film theory and criticism will function as important analytical tools. Prerequisites: FLM 105 and 150.

Upper Division Requirements

Complete twelve (12) additional units from the following:

FLM 300 National Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (even years).

National Cinema is an advanced course focusing on the most significant films and filmmakers of one country. It looks at cinematic history and practice in the nation being covered and may include a consideration of popular, independent, and/or art film. The course may cover the entire history of cinema in one nation or focus on a particular type of film or cinematic movement in one country. Special attention will be paid to the socio-historical contexts of the films assigned during the course. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 150.

FLM 301 Basic Screenwriting

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of writing for the screen. The elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema will be studied. Students will learn how to construct screenplays by closely examining produced films, reading film scripts, and writing their own short screenplays. The course will provide a foundation in the basics of the three-act act structure, dramatic action, character arc, the revision process, and an introduction to the business of screenwriting. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished a twenty- to thirty-page screenplay for a short film suitable for production. Prerequisite: ENG 113 and FLM 105.

FLM 302 Writing Short Screenplays

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course is an intermediate level treatment of the principles of writing for the screen. It expands on the concepts covered in Basic Screenwriting, deepening the students’ knowledge of the elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema while building the students’ skills in the development of these elements in their own writing. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished screenplay for a 1-hour film. Prerequisite: FLM 301.

FLM 303 Asian Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (odd years).

This survey course offers a unique opportunity to screen and study technically innovative and culturally significant feature films from China, India, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Special attention will be given to the diverse genres in Asian cinema and the dynamic interactions between filmmaking and socio-historical transformation. An East-West comparative approach will be encouraged. Prerequisites: FLM 105 and 150.

FLM 305 Christianity and Film

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course centers on the close reading of both religious and secular filmic texts in order to better understand the ideology that is wrapped within these artifacts of culture. Students will describe and analyze how these cinematic texts communicate both Christian and anti-Christian philosophical and theological arguments, which have the power to shape the horizons of the mind and impact culture. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

FLM 340 Major Directors

Units: 3. Offered: Fall (odd years).

With attention to theories about authorship and the auteur, this course surveys the work of one or two major directors. This course may treat a canonical auteur, such as Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, or Akira Kurosawa, or may focus upon figures historically marginalized within cinema studies, such Oscar Micheaux, Ida Lupino, or Sam Fuller. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 350 Film and Literature

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course addresses the adaptation of literature to film. It examines diverse concepts and theories that have been applied to cinematic adaptations of literary texts as part of a larger constellation of issues, including the development of cinematic language, approaches to genre studies, and an appreciation for cinematic visions in literary texts. In addition to film screenings, course readings will include prose fiction and film criticism. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

FLM 400 Special Topics in Film Studies

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

This course focuses on a different subject in the field of cinema studies each time it is offered. Designed to reflect both our rapidly changing culture and the technologically progressive nature of the film industry, this course is devoted to a critical examination of film with regard to, for example, time period, genre, theme, etc. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 403 Writing Adapted Screenplays

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This is a course in the art of writing a feature-length film script based on a piece of literature or other literary material. Contemporary feature film structure paradigms will be reviewed as the student (individually or in pairs) crafts their own feature-length screenplay from a self-selected literary source. The art of the studio “pitch” used to sell a screenplay also will be reviewed and practiced. Prerequisite: FLM 301.

FLM 420 Independent Film and Counter-Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Fall (even years).

Independent Film and Counter-cinema is an advanced course that studies diverse film texts considered “independent” while examining the varied and constantly evolving definition of independent film. In addition, the course investigates counter-cinema—film that actively opposes mainstream cinema, offering alternative discourses—and explores the complex relationship between independent film and counter-cinema. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 430 Film and Sound

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (even years).

Thoughtfully addressing the importance of film’s auditory component, which is often ignored or taken for granted by visually-dominated studies of the moving pictures, this course critically engages the importance of sound to cinema, from a theoretical as well as a historical perspective. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 450 World Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

World Cinema is an advanced course focusing on films made outside of North America and their socio-historical contexts. It looks at cinematic history and practice in diverse nations and introduces students to a range of non-Hollywood film styles and forms, including popular and art cinemas, from across the globe. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 470 Adaptation and Intertextuality

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (odd years).

This advanced course focuses on diverse texts and theories regarding adaptation and intertextuality as they impact film and other media. The course explores the ways in which texts are adapted from one medium into other media and the ways in which texts intersect and communicate with one another. The complex manner in which adaptation and intertextuality function in our media-saturated, global culture is investigated. Texts that might be examined in this course include films, video games, television shows, novels, comics/graphic novels, operas, and musicals. Course content will vary. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 491 Film Practicum

Units: 1-15. Offered: As Offered.

Students participate in an internship experience in some aspect of the Hollywood film or television industry. These are non-paying positions that may be part of an actual Hollywood film or television production, or similar entertainment industry experience with development companies, agencies, producers, etc. Unit value will vary in relation to time commitment and the individual’s learning contract. Students will be supervised by a member of the Film Studies faculty. Prerequisite: FLM 250 and junior status.

FLP 306 Basic Production: Line Producing

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This class will approach film production from prep to post from the perspective of the independent film producer. This will include introductory workshops on all the different departments, including technical areas such as grip, electric, and camera. The students will learn how to break down and budget a script, schedule a shoot, create and fill out paper work such as deal memos, call sheets, contracts, location scouting, and holding auditions. Prerequisite: FLM 105; Pre- or Co- requisite: FLM 301.

FLP 360 Cinematography

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

An introduction to the fundamental tools and principles used by cinematographers to create digital or film images generated from the context of the story. Curriculum covers visualization, digital manipulation, sensitometry, filters and lenses, lighting, color, processing procedures, camera systems, special effects, and image control. Prerequisite: FLP 306.

FLP 406 Film Directing

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course explores a range of ideas, methods, and theories of narrative film directing. While helping students understand the director’s complex functions in the creative process of directing, the course mainly focuses on the study of and practice in two areas: directing the camera and directing actors. Significant time is devoted to the understanding of acting and working with actors (casting, rehearsal, character development, and performing for the camera). Students will work in groups on a series of focused short projects to build the creative experience step by step. Prerequisite: FLP 360.

B.A. Film

Film is the most culturally influential artistic medium in our era. The film major equips students both to understand film as a culture-shaping force and to pursue diverse careers in the entertainment industry. Students choose one of three concentrations: Film Production, Screenwriting, or Film Analysis and Industry. Film majors develop valuable technical knowledge and experience as well as sharp critical thinking skills and significant audio-visual literacy. In a world that increasingly relies on visual information, a comprehension of how meaning grows out of the moving image is indispensable to a deeper social and cultural understanding. Our majors have the opportunity to learn how to apply this knowledge to filmmaking by creating high quality films on state-of-the-art equipment, writing screenplays and teleplays, and exploring the best of global cinema.

General Education Courses

The general education requirements will follow the curriculum set forth for other university programs. Some general education requirements will be met through specific major requirements.

Lower Division Requirements

DES 110 Design Thought Foundations I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will be an introduction to 2D design thinking, as applied to the interrelated, interdisciplinary fields of design and as understood from a biblical world-view. Basic design theories, principles, major movements and works will be covered. Basic creative approaches and design expressions are explored through projects, class discussions, field trips and lectures. This course is an introduction to the design paths available through the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, but also serves non-design majors interested in discovering design.

FLM 105 Introduction to Film Studies

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course offers an introduction to methods and approaches for the study of film. Students will learn film terminology and its effective application in film analysis. Students also will develop, maintain, and improve strategies for close-reading individual shots and sequences, interpreting cinematic narrative and technique, and for negotiating various critical and theoretical paradigms of film study.

FLM 150 Film History

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course studies the development of film history from its beginnings in the late nineteenth century up to the present day. As the growth of cinema has been a global phenomenon, we will look at major films, filmmakers, and film movements in the United States and around the world. Pre- or Co- requisite: ENG 123. Recommended: FLM 105.

FLM 250 Film Theory and Criticism

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course introduces students to the major areas and concepts of film theory and criticism, from their inception in the early twentieth century to the present. It examines how various film theories, as part of a long-standing tradition of critical reflections on life and the arts in general, evolve and interact with one another and with neighboring discourses, nationally and internationally. Knowledge and skills gained in this class will prepare students for further upper-division film courses, in which film theory and criticism will function as important analytical tools. Prerequisites: FLM 105 and 150.

Upper Division Requirements

FLM 350 Film and Literature

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course addresses the adaptation of literature to film. It examines diverse concepts and theories that have been applied to cinematic adaptations of literary texts as part of a larger constellation of issues, including the development of cinematic language, approaches to genre studies, and an appreciation for cinematic visions in literary texts. In addition to film screenings, course readings will include prose fiction and film criticism. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

FLM 450 World Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

World Cinema is an advanced course focusing on films made outside of North America and their socio-historical contexts. It looks at cinematic history and practice in diverse nations and introduces students to a range of non-Hollywood film styles and forms, including popular and art cinemas, from across the globe. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 499 Senior Capstone Project

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This three-unit senior capstone project serves to assess the subject matter competence of the Film Studies major. During the semester, students will compose a philosophy statement, compile a portfolio of previous work, and complete a capstone paper or film project. The class meets with its instructor one hour per week while completing the tasks of the course. Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean of the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design.

Upper Division Elective Requirements

Complete three (3) units from the following:

FLM 430 Film and Sound

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (even years).

Thoughtfully addressing the importance of film’s auditory component, which is often ignored or taken for granted by visually-dominated studies of the moving pictures, this course critically engages the importance of sound to cinema, from a theoretical as well as a historical perspective. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 470 Adaptation and Intertextuality

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (odd years).

This advanced course focuses on diverse texts and theories regarding adaptation and intertextuality as they impact film and other media. The course explores the ways in which texts are adapted from one medium into other media and the ways in which texts intersect and communicate with one another. The complex manner in which adaptation and intertextuality function in our media-saturated, global culture is investigated. Texts that might be examined in this course include films, video games, television shows, novels, comics/graphic novels, operas, and musicals. Course content will vary. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

Concentration Courses

Students must complete all requirements (21-22 units) in one of the following concentrations: Film Analysis and Industry, Film Production, Film Production: Los Angeles Film Study Center, Screenwriting.
See concentrations tab for details.

Student Learning Outcomes

Film Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)

  1. Communication Competency: Graduating Film majors will explain the cultural, social, and spiritual relevance of film through written, discursive, and multi-media communication.
  2. Critical Analysis: Graduating Film majors will produce researched critical analyses that reflect the broader historical, cultural, and religious contexts of cinematic artifacts.
  3. Diversity: Graduating Film majors will produce critical analyses, screenplays, and/or film projects that communicate an understanding of and respect for diverse perspectives, including those related to religion, race, gender, and social class.
  4. Theoretical Approach & Methodology: Graduating Film majors will demonstrate the application of theory to filmic texts through oral, written, and visual forms of communication.
  5. Professional and Graduate Preparation: Graduating Film majors will be equipped to pursue professional film-related occupations and graduate studies.
CURRICULUM PATH

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

B.A. Film

2 Year Transfer

The film major equips students both to understand film as a culture-shaping force and to pursue diverse careers in the entertainment industry. Students choose one of three concentrations: Film Production, Screenwriting, or Film Analysis and Industry. Film majors develop valuable technical knowledge and experience as well as sharp critical thinking skills and significant audio-visual literacy. Our majors have the opportunity to learn how to apply this knowledge to filmmaking by creating high quality films on state-of-the-art equipment, writing screenplays and teleplays, and exploring the best of global cinema.

CBU Film program has been designed to seamlessly integrate transfer students.  In particular, students who successfully transfer academic credit which fulfills all of CBU’s general education credits (except Christian Studies general education) are able to earn their B.A. of Photography in 2 years time.  Transfer students should refer to CBU Articulation Agreements to explore which academic credit units transfer from their institution.

Below is a suggested course schedule for a 2-year transfer student, presuming successful transfer of general education credits.  Please refer to the B.A. Film program page for complete degree requirements.

Film Analysis & Industry Concentration

First Semester

DES 110 Design Thought Foundations I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will be an introduction to 2D design thinking, as applied to the interrelated, interdisciplinary fields of design and as understood from a biblical world-view. Basic design theories, principles, major movements and works will be covered. Basic creative approaches and design expressions are explored through projects, class discussions, field trips and lectures. This course is an introduction to the design paths available through the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, but also serves non-design majors interested in discovering design.

FLM 105 Introduction to Film Studies

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course offers an introduction to methods and approaches for the study of film. Students will learn film terminology and its effective application in film analysis. Students also will develop, maintain, and improve strategies for close-reading individual shots and sequences, interpreting cinematic narrative and technique, and for negotiating various critical and theoretical paradigms of film study.

FLM 340 Major Directors

Units: 3. Offered: Fall (odd years).

With attention to theories about authorship and the auteur, this course surveys the work of one or two major directors. This course may treat a canonical auteur, such as Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, or Akira Kurosawa, or may focus upon figures historically marginalized within cinema studies, such Oscar Micheaux, Ida Lupino, or Sam Fuller. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

Concentration Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

Christian Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

Second Semester

FLM 150 Film History

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course studies the development of film history from its beginnings in the late nineteenth century up to the present day. As the growth of cinema has been a global phenomenon, we will look at major films, filmmakers, and film movements in the United States and around the world. Pre- or Co- requisite: ENG 123. Recommended: FLM 105.

FLM 250 Film Theory and Criticism

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course introduces students to the major areas and concepts of film theory and criticism, from their inception in the early twentieth century to the present. It examines how various film theories, as part of a long-standing tradition of critical reflections on life and the arts in general, evolve and interact with one another and with neighboring discourses, nationally and internationally. Knowledge and skills gained in this class will prepare students for further upper-division film courses, in which film theory and criticism will function as important analytical tools. Prerequisites: FLM 105 and 150.

Concentration Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

Concentration_Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

Christian Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

Third Semester

FLM 350 Film and Literature

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course addresses the adaptation of literature to film. It examines diverse concepts and theories that have been applied to cinematic adaptations of literary texts as part of a larger constellation of issues, including the development of cinematic language, approaches to genre studies, and an appreciation for cinematic visions in literary texts. In addition to film screenings, course readings will include prose fiction and film criticism. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

FLM 420 Independent Film and Counter-Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Fall (even years).

Independent Film and Counter-cinema is an advanced course that studies diverse film texts considered “independent” while examining the varied and constantly evolving definition of independent film. In addition, the course investigates counter-cinema—film that actively opposes mainstream cinema, offering alternative discourses—and explores the complex relationship between independent film and counter-cinema. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 450 World Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

World Cinema is an advanced course focusing on films made outside of North America and their socio-historical contexts. It looks at cinematic history and practice in diverse nations and introduces students to a range of non-Hollywood film styles and forms, including popular and art cinemas, from across the globe. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

Concentration Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

Fourth Semester

FLM 430 Film and Sound

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (even years).

Thoughtfully addressing the importance of film’s auditory component, which is often ignored or taken for granted by visually-dominated studies of the moving pictures, this course critically engages the importance of sound to cinema, from a theoretical as well as a historical perspective. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 499 Senior Capstone Project

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This three-unit senior capstone project serves to assess the subject matter competence of the Film Studies major. During the semester, students will compose a philosophy statement, compile a portfolio of previous work, and complete a capstone paper or film project. The class meets with its instructor one hour per week while completing the tasks of the course. Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean of the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design.

Concentration Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

Christian Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

CURRICULUM PATH

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Film Production Concentration

First Semester

DES 110 Design Thought Foundations I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will be an introduction to 2D design thinking, as applied to the interrelated, interdisciplinary fields of design and as understood from a biblical world-view. Basic design theories, principles, major movements and works will be covered. Basic creative approaches and design expressions are explored through projects, class discussions, field trips and lectures. This course is an introduction to the design paths available through the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, but also serves non-design majors interested in discovering design.

FLM 105 Introduction to Film Studies

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course offers an introduction to methods and approaches for the study of film. Students will learn film terminology and its effective application in film analysis. Students also will develop, maintain, and improve strategies for close-reading individual shots and sequences, interpreting cinematic narrative and technique, and for negotiating various critical and theoretical paradigms of film study.

FLM 301 Basic Screenwriting

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of writing for the screen. The elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema will be studied. Students will learn how to construct screenplays by closely examining produced films, reading film scripts, and writing their own short screenplays. The course will provide a foundation in the basics of the three-act act structure, dramatic action, character arc, the revision process, and an introduction to the business of screenwriting. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished a twenty- to thirty-page screenplay for a short film suitable for production. Prerequisite: ENG 113 and FLM 105.

PHY 112 The Physics of Hollywood with Lab

Units: 4. Offered: Spring.

A study of optics, cameras, lighting, sound, analog vs. digital processes, polarization and the 3-D moving making process. The course is a very lab intensive class taught in a semi inquiry-based manner. The class and lab are heavily integrated. The course is a self contained class which includes some reviews of the math necessary to be successful in the class. Additional lab fee.

Christian Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

Second Semester

FLM 150 Film History

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course studies the development of film history from its beginnings in the late nineteenth century up to the present day. As the growth of cinema has been a global phenomenon, we will look at major films, filmmakers, and film movements in the United States and around the world. Pre- or Co- requisite: ENG 123. Recommended: FLM 105.

FLM 250 Film Theory and Criticism

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course introduces students to the major areas and concepts of film theory and criticism, from their inception in the early twentieth century to the present. It examines how various film theories, as part of a long-standing tradition of critical reflections on life and the arts in general, evolve and interact with one another and with neighboring discourses, nationally and internationally. Knowledge and skills gained in this class will prepare students for further upper-division film courses, in which film theory and criticism will function as important analytical tools. Prerequisites: FLM 105 and 150.

FLP 170 Basic Production: Visual Storytelling

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

An introduction to the production of visual storytelling content. Each student will write, direct, and edit a series of exploratory production exercises. The primary emphasis is on telling a compelling story by employing basic cinematography, lighting, editing, sound and on-camera talent to involve an audience emotionally with the characters on screen. This course is restricted to Film majors and minors only. Pre- or Co-Requisite: FLM 105.

Christian Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

Christian_Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

Third Semester

DES 310 Design Thought Practicum

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

Design Thought Practicum builds on and continues the process of understanding interdisciplinary design thinking.  The aim of the course is for students to apply the principles and processes of design thinking to the act of design. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to complete design exercises and projects.  Topics include developing a larger framework for design, design methods, design process, human factors in design, and environmental factors. Prerequisite: DES 110.

FLM 350 Film and Literature

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course addresses the adaptation of literature to film. It examines diverse concepts and theories that have been applied to cinematic adaptations of literary texts as part of a larger constellation of issues, including the development of cinematic language, approaches to genre studies, and an appreciation for cinematic visions in literary texts. In addition to film screenings, course readings will include prose fiction and film criticism. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

FLM 450 World Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

World Cinema is an advanced course focusing on films made outside of North America and their socio-historical contexts. It looks at cinematic history and practice in diverse nations and introduces students to a range of non-Hollywood film styles and forms, including popular and art cinemas, from across the globe. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLP 306 Basic Production: Line Producing

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This class will approach film production from prep to post from the perspective of the independent film producer. This will include introductory workshops on all the different departments, including technical areas such as grip, electric, and camera. The students will learn how to break down and budget a script, schedule a shoot, create and fill out paper work such as deal memos, call sheets, contracts, location scouting, and holding auditions. Prerequisite: FLM 105; Pre- or Co- requisite: FLM 301.

FLP 406 Film Directing

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course explores a range of ideas, methods, and theories of narrative film directing. While helping students understand the director’s complex functions in the creative process of directing, the course mainly focuses on the study of and practice in two areas: directing the camera and directing actors. Significant time is devoted to the understanding of acting and working with actors (casting, rehearsal, character development, and performing for the camera). Students will work in groups on a series of focused short projects to build the creative experience step by step. Prerequisite: FLP 360.

Fourth Semester

FLM 430 Film and Sound

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (even years).

Thoughtfully addressing the importance of film’s auditory component, which is often ignored or taken for granted by visually-dominated studies of the moving pictures, this course critically engages the importance of sound to cinema, from a theoretical as well as a historical perspective. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 499 Senior Capstone Project

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This three-unit senior capstone project serves to assess the subject matter competence of the Film Studies major. During the semester, students will compose a philosophy statement, compile a portfolio of previous work, and complete a capstone paper or film project. The class meets with its instructor one hour per week while completing the tasks of the course. Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean of the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design.

FLP 360 Cinematography

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

An introduction to the fundamental tools and principles used by cinematographers to create digital or film images generated from the context of the story. Curriculum covers visualization, digital manipulation, sensitometry, filters and lenses, lighting, color, processing procedures, camera systems, special effects, and image control. Prerequisite: FLP 306.

Concentration Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

CURRICULUM PATH

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Screenwriting Concentration

First Semester

DES 110 Design Thought Foundations I

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

The course will be an introduction to 2D design thinking, as applied to the interrelated, interdisciplinary fields of design and as understood from a biblical world-view. Basic design theories, principles, major movements and works will be covered. Basic creative approaches and design expressions are explored through projects, class discussions, field trips and lectures. This course is an introduction to the design paths available through the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, but also serves non-design majors interested in discovering design.

FLM 105 Introduction to Film Studies

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course offers an introduction to methods and approaches for the study of film. Students will learn film terminology and its effective application in film analysis. Students also will develop, maintain, and improve strategies for close-reading individual shots and sequences, interpreting cinematic narrative and technique, and for negotiating various critical and theoretical paradigms of film study.

FLM 301 Basic Screenwriting

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of writing for the screen. The elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema will be studied. Students will learn how to construct screenplays by closely examining produced films, reading film scripts, and writing their own short screenplays. The course will provide a foundation in the basics of the three-act act structure, dramatic action, character arc, the revision process, and an introduction to the business of screenwriting. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished a twenty- to thirty-page screenplay for a short film suitable for production. Prerequisite: ENG 113 and FLM 105.

ENG 201 Introduction to Literature for Majors and Minors (or ENG 273)

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

An intensive study of literary terminology and the major genres of American, British, European, and multicultural literature. Focuses on critical reading and intelligent appreciation of literature, and ways of writing about literature. Majors and minors should take this introduction course during their sophomore year as soon as they successfully complete ENG 123. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

Christian Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

Second Semester

FLM 150 Film History

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course studies the development of film history from its beginnings in the late nineteenth century up to the present day. As the growth of cinema has been a global phenomenon, we will look at major films, filmmakers, and film movements in the United States and around the world. Pre- or Co- requisite: ENG 123. Recommended: FLM 105.

FLM 250 Film Theory and Criticism

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course introduces students to the major areas and concepts of film theory and criticism, from their inception in the early twentieth century to the present. It examines how various film theories, as part of a long-standing tradition of critical reflections on life and the arts in general, evolve and interact with one another and with neighboring discourses, nationally and internationally. Knowledge and skills gained in this class will prepare students for further upper-division film courses, in which film theory and criticism will function as important analytical tools. Prerequisites: FLM 105 and 150.

FLM 302 Writing Short Screenplays

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course is an intermediate level treatment of the principles of writing for the screen. It expands on the concepts covered in Basic Screenwriting, deepening the students’ knowledge of the elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema while building the students’ skills in the development of these elements in their own writing. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished screenplay for a 1-hour film. Prerequisite: FLM 301.

Concentration Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

Christian Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

Third Semester

FLM 350 Film and Literature

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course addresses the adaptation of literature to film. It examines diverse concepts and theories that have been applied to cinematic adaptations of literary texts as part of a larger constellation of issues, including the development of cinematic language, approaches to genre studies, and an appreciation for cinematic visions in literary texts. In addition to film screenings, course readings will include prose fiction and film criticism. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

FLM 403 Writing Adapted Screenplays

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This is a course in the art of writing a feature-length film script based on a piece of literature or other literary material. Contemporary feature film structure paradigms will be reviewed as the student (individually or in pairs) crafts their own feature-length screenplay from a self-selected literary source. The art of the studio “pitch” used to sell a screenplay also will be reviewed and practiced. Prerequisite: FLM 301.

FLM 450 World Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

World Cinema is an advanced course focusing on films made outside of North America and their socio-historical contexts. It looks at cinematic history and practice in diverse nations and introduces students to a range of non-Hollywood film styles and forms, including popular and art cinemas, from across the globe. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

Concentration Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

Fourth Semester

FLM 430 Film and Sound

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (even years).

Thoughtfully addressing the importance of film’s auditory component, which is often ignored or taken for granted by visually-dominated studies of the moving pictures, this course critically engages the importance of sound to cinema, from a theoretical as well as a historical perspective. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 499 Senior Capstone Project

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This three-unit senior capstone project serves to assess the subject matter competence of the Film Studies major. During the semester, students will compose a philosophy statement, compile a portfolio of previous work, and complete a capstone paper or film project. The class meets with its instructor one hour per week while completing the tasks of the course. Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean of the College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design.

Concentration Course

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

Degree Concentration Course (Varied)

Christian Studies (General Education)

Units: 3. Offered: As Offered.

CST110, 130, 300, 350, 360, 370, 491 (ISP prep); ICS105, 375

CURRICULUM PATH

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Film Concentrations

Students must complete all requirements in one of the following concentrations: Film Analysis and Industry; Film Production; Film Production: LAFSC; Screenwriting

Film Analysis & Industry

In the Film Analysis concentration, students have the opportunity to take the broadest range of film studies courses. This concentration is recommended for students who are interested in pursuing careers in education, journalism (film or arts criticism), archiving, or any position on the corporate side of the entertainment industry (agent, manager, publicist, etc.).

Core Requirements:

FLM 340 Major Directors

Units: 3. Offered: Fall (odd years).

With attention to theories about authorship and the auteur, this course surveys the work of one or two major directors. This course may treat a canonical auteur, such as Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, or Akira Kurosawa, or may focus upon figures historically marginalized within cinema studies, such Oscar Micheaux, Ida Lupino, or Sam Fuller. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 420 Independent Film and Counter-Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Fall (even years).

Independent Film and Counter-cinema is an advanced course that studies diverse film texts considered “independent” while examining the varied and constantly evolving definition of independent film. In addition, the course investigates counter-cinema—film that actively opposes mainstream cinema, offering alternative discourses—and explores the complex relationship between independent film and counter-cinema. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

Complete fifteen (15) additional units, of which twelve (12) must be upper division, from the following:

ART 385 Film as Visual Art

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

Film as Visual Art is a study of masterworks of cinematic art with an emphasis on visual aesthetics and cultural influences. The class will examine selected International cinematic classics, focusing on the film’s director, or ‘auteur’. The French idea of “camera as style” (pen) will be explored through the film director’s use of camera angles, composition, editing and lighting will be explored will be deconstructed, in a manner consistent with traditional forms of visual art. Also under consideration will be the way that these visual elements stand in dynamic/creative tension with the visual culture of their national origin or context. Included in this would be fashion, art, politics and philosophy.

DES 310 Design Thought Practicum

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

Design Thought Practicum builds on and continues the process of understanding interdisciplinary design thinking.  The aim of the course is for students to apply the principles and processes of design thinking to the act of design. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to complete design exercises and projects.  Topics include developing a larger framework for design, design methods, design process, human factors in design, and environmental factors. Prerequisite: DES 110.

FLM 200 Special Topics in Film Studies

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

This course focuses on a different subject in the field of cinema studies each time it is offered. Designed to reflect both our rapidly changing culture and the technologically progressive nature of the film industry, this course is devoted to a critical examination of film with regard to, for example, time period, genre, theme, etc. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 210 Film Genre

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

This introduction to genre studies will survey the development of at least one major film genre, such as the Western, the romantic comedy, the war film, or film noir. Alternatively, several genres may be covered in one semester. Assigned films will be accompanied by readings in relevant critical and literary texts. Contact professor for specific content information. Prerequisite: FLM 105 or 150.

FLM 300 National Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (even years).

National Cinema is an advanced course focusing on the most significant films and filmmakers of one country. It looks at cinematic history and practice in the nation being covered and may include a consideration of popular, independent, and/or art film. The course may cover the entire history of cinema in one nation or focus on a particular type of film or cinematic movement in one country. Special attention will be paid to the socio-historical contexts of the films assigned during the course. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 150.

FLM 301 Basic Screenwriting

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of writing for the screen. The elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema will be studied. Students will learn how to construct screenplays by closely examining produced films, reading film scripts, and writing their own short screenplays. The course will provide a foundation in the basics of the three-act act structure, dramatic action, character arc, the revision process, and an introduction to the business of screenwriting. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished a twenty- to thirty-page screenplay for a short film suitable for production. Prerequisite: ENG 113 and FLM 105.

FLM 302 Writing Short Screenplays

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course is an intermediate level treatment of the principles of writing for the screen. It expands on the concepts covered in Basic Screenwriting, deepening the students’ knowledge of the elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema while building the students’ skills in the development of these elements in their own writing. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished screenplay for a 1-hour film. Prerequisite: FLM 301.

FLM 303 Asian Cinema

Units: 3. Offered: Spring (odd years).

This survey course offers a unique opportunity to screen and study technically innovative and culturally significant feature films from China, India, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Special attention will be given to the diverse genres in Asian cinema and the dynamic interactions between filmmaking and socio-historical transformation. An East-West comparative approach will be encouraged. Prerequisites: FLM 105 and 150.

FLM 305 Christianity and Film

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course centers on the close reading of both religious and secular filmic texts in order to better understand the ideology that is wrapped within these artifacts of culture. Students will describe and analyze how these cinematic texts communicate both Christian and anti-Christian philosophical and theological arguments, which have the power to shape the horizons of the mind and impact culture. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

FLM 400 Special Topics in Film Studies

Units: 3. Offered: As offered.

This course focuses on a different subject in the field of cinema studies each time it is offered. Designed to reflect both our rapidly changing culture and the technologically progressive nature of the film industry, this course is devoted to a critical examination of film with regard to, for example, time period, genre, theme, etc. May be taken multiple times with change in topic. Prerequisite: FLM 250.

FLM 403 Writing Adapted Screenplays

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This is a course in the art of writing a feature-length film script based on a piece of literature or other literary material. Contemporary feature film structure paradigms will be reviewed as the student (individually or in pairs) crafts their own feature-length screenplay from a self-selected literary source. The art of the studio “pitch” used to sell a screenplay also will be reviewed and practiced. Prerequisite: FLM 301.

FLM 491 Film Practicum

Units: 1-15. Offered: As Offered.

Students participate in an internship experience in some aspect of the Hollywood film or television industry. These are non-paying positions that may be part of an actual Hollywood film or television production, or similar entertainment industry experience with development companies, agencies, producers, etc. Unit value will vary in relation to time commitment and the individual’s learning contract. Students will be supervised by a member of the Film Studies faculty. Prerequisite: FLM 250 and junior status.

FLP 170 Basic Production: Visual Storytelling

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

An introduction to the production of visual storytelling content. Each student will write, direct, and edit a series of exploratory production exercises. The primary emphasis is on telling a compelling story by employing basic cinematography, lighting, editing, sound and on-camera talent to involve an audience emotionally with the characters on screen. This course is restricted to Film majors and minors only. Pre- or Co-Requisite: FLM 105.

FLP 306 Basic Production: Line Producing

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This class will approach film production from prep to post from the perspective of the independent film producer. This will include introductory workshops on all the different departments, including technical areas such as grip, electric, and camera. The students will learn how to break down and budget a script, schedule a shoot, create and fill out paper work such as deal memos, call sheets, contracts, location scouting, and holding auditions. Prerequisite: FLM 105; Pre- or Co- requisite: FLM 301.

FLP 360 Cinematography

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

An introduction to the fundamental tools and principles used by cinematographers to create digital or film images generated from the context of the story. Curriculum covers visualization, digital manipulation, sensitometry, filters and lenses, lighting, color, processing procedures, camera systems, special effects, and image control. Prerequisite: FLP 306.

FLP 406 Film Directing

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course explores a range of ideas, methods, and theories of narrative film directing. While helping students understand the director’s complex functions in the creative process of directing, the course mainly focuses on the study of and practice in two areas: directing the camera and directing actors. Significant time is devoted to the understanding of acting and working with actors (casting, rehearsal, character development, and performing for the camera). Students will work in groups on a series of focused short projects to build the creative experience step by step. Prerequisite: FLP 360.

PHY 112 The Physics of Hollywood with Lab

Units: 4. Offered: Spring.

A study of optics, cameras, lighting, sound, analog vs. digital processes, polarization and the 3-D moving making process. The course is a very lab intensive class taught in a semi inquiry-based manner. The class and lab are heavily integrated. The course is a self contained class which includes some reviews of the math necessary to be successful in the class. Additional lab fee.

THE 113 Makeup for Stage and Screen

Units: 2. Offered: Fall, Spring.

This course provides a foundation for the student actor and designer in the materials, tools, and application techniques of stage and film makeup. Students will develop skills in brush and sponge application techniques, the design of old age and character specific facial alterations, historical makeup effects and three-dimensional appliances. Students will develop an appreciation of relative viewing distance in the level of subtlety of makeup effects for theatre versus film. Each student will assemble a makeup kit that will be used to prepare projects in class and for productions.

Film Production – On Campus

The Film Production concentration is designed for students who desire to be involved in the production side of the business. Students can choose to take the core courses for this concentration on the CBU campus or in one semester at the Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC), a program sponsored by the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities. Students will learn the technology and artistry of filmmaking in classes ranging from film directing to video editing and get hands-on experience making their own films. Students completing the Film Production concentration on the CBU campus complete all the following:

DES 310 Design Thought Practicum

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

Design Thought Practicum builds on and continues the process of understanding interdisciplinary design thinking.  The aim of the course is for students to apply the principles and processes of design thinking to the act of design. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams to complete design exercises and projects.  Topics include developing a larger framework for design, design methods, design process, human factors in design, and environmental factors. Prerequisite: DES 110.

FLM 301 Basic Screenwriting

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of writing for the screen. The elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema will be studied. Students will learn how to construct screenplays by closely examining produced films, reading film scripts, and writing their own short screenplays. The course will provide a foundation in the basics of the three-act act structure, dramatic action, character arc, the revision process, and an introduction to the business of screenwriting. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished a twenty- to thirty-page screenplay for a short film suitable for production. Prerequisite: ENG 113 and FLM 105.

FLP 170 Basic Production: Visual Storytelling

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

An introduction to the production of visual storytelling content. Each student will write, direct, and edit a series of exploratory production exercises. The primary emphasis is on telling a compelling story by employing basic cinematography, lighting, editing, sound and on-camera talent to involve an audience emotionally with the characters on screen. This course is restricted to Film majors and minors only. Pre- or Co-Requisite: FLM 105.

FLP 306 Basic Production: Line Producing

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This class will approach film production from prep to post from the perspective of the independent film producer. This will include introductory workshops on all the different departments, including technical areas such as grip, electric, and camera. The students will learn how to break down and budget a script, schedule a shoot, create and fill out paper work such as deal memos, call sheets, contracts, location scouting, and holding auditions. Prerequisite: FLM 105; Pre- or Co- requisite: FLM 301.

FLP 360 Cinematography

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

An introduction to the fundamental tools and principles used by cinematographers to create digital or film images generated from the context of the story. Curriculum covers visualization, digital manipulation, sensitometry, filters and lenses, lighting, color, processing procedures, camera systems, special effects, and image control. Prerequisite: FLP 306.

FLP 406 Film Directing

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course explores a range of ideas, methods, and theories of narrative film directing. While helping students understand the director’s complex functions in the creative process of directing, the course mainly focuses on the study of and practice in two areas: directing the camera and directing actors. Significant time is devoted to the understanding of acting and working with actors (casting, rehearsal, character development, and performing for the camera). Students will work in groups on a series of focused short projects to build the creative experience step by step. Prerequisite: FLP 360.

Complete three (3) additional units from the following:

ART 385, DES 310, FLM 200, 300, 303, 305, 340, 400, 420, 491, GDM 341, THE 113.

Screenwriting

The Screenwriting concentration prepares students for a career in the field. It is designed for students who are interested in writing scripts for film or television. Courses from Basic Screenwriting through Writing Adapted Screenplays work on developing writing skills as well as “pitching” the script.

FLM 301 Basic Screenwriting

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of writing for the screen. The elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema will be studied. Students will learn how to construct screenplays by closely examining produced films, reading film scripts, and writing their own short screenplays. The course will provide a foundation in the basics of the three-act act structure, dramatic action, character arc, the revision process, and an introduction to the business of screenwriting. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished a twenty- to thirty-page screenplay for a short film suitable for production. Prerequisite: ENG 113 and FLM 105.

FLM 302 Writing Short Screenplays

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

This course is an intermediate level treatment of the principles of writing for the screen. It expands on the concepts covered in Basic Screenwriting, deepening the students’ knowledge of the elements of theme, plot, character, and dialogue in dramatic writing for cinema while building the students’ skills in the development of these elements in their own writing. By the end of the semester, students will have produced and polished screenplay for a 1-hour film. Prerequisite: FLM 301.

FLM 403 Writing Adapted Screenplays

Units: 3. Offered: Fall.

This is a course in the art of writing a feature-length film script based on a piece of literature or other literary material. Contemporary feature film structure paradigms will be reviewed as the student (individually or in pairs) crafts their own feature-length screenplay from a self-selected literary source. The art of the studio “pitch” used to sell a screenplay also will be reviewed and practiced. Prerequisite: FLM 301.

ENG 201 Introduction to Literature for Majors and Minors (or ENG 273)

Units: 3. Offered: Fall, Spring.

An intensive study of literary terminology and the major genres of American, British, European, and multicultural literature. Focuses on critical reading and intelligent appreciation of literature, and ways of writing about literature. Majors and minors should take this introduction course during their sophomore year as soon as they successfully complete ENG 123. Prerequisite: ENG 123.

Complete nine (9) additional units from the following:
ART 385, DES 310, FLM 200, 300, 303, 305, 340, 400, 420, 491, FLP170, 306, 360, 406, THE 113.

Film Production – Los Angeles Film Studies Center

As a participant in the Coalition for Christian Colleges and Universities and a “sending institution” for the Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC), CBU gives students the opportunity to study for one semester through the Center in Los Angeles, California. Completion of this concentration is contingent upon admittance to the Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC) program.

Core requirements:

FLP 170 Basic Production: Visual Storytelling

Units: 3. Offered: Spring.

An introduction to the production of visual storytelling content. Each student will write, direct, and edit a series of exploratory production exercises. The primary emphasis is on telling a compelling story by employing basic cinematography, lighting, editing, sound and on-camera talent to involve an audience emotionally with the characters on screen. This course is restricted to Film majors and minors only. Pre- or Co-Requisite: FLM 105.

Complete three (3) additional units from the following:

ART 385, DES 310, FLM 200, 300, 303, 305, 340, 400, 420, 491, THE 113.

LA Film Studies Center Requirements:

Hollywood Production Workshop (4 units)
Faith and Artistic Development (3 units)
Narrative Storytelling (3 units)
Note: All LAFSC students also are required to take Internship: Inside Hollywood (6 units).

Student Learning Outcomes

Film Student Learning Outcomes (SLO)

  1. Communication Competency: Graduating Film Studies majors will explain the cultural, social, and spiritual relevance of film through written, discursive, and multi-media communication.
  2. Critical Analysis: Graduating Film Studies majors will produce researched critical analyses that reflect the broader historical, cultural, and religious contexts of cinematic artifacts.
  3. Diversity: Graduating Film Studies majors will produce critical analyses that communicate the diverse perspectives articulated through cinematic texts.
  4. Theoretical Approach: Graduating Film Studies majors will demonstrate the application of theory to filmic texts through oral, written, and visual forms of communication.
  5. Professional and Graduate: Graduating Film Studies majors will be equipped to pursue professional film-related occupations and graduate studies.
CURRICULUM PATH

The following documents outline a suggested course schedule.

Launch your Creative Career

Film Studies is one of the fastest growing disciplines at universities and colleges in the U.S. Interdisciplinary in nature, Film Studies incorporates other fields such as history, art, popular culture, and communications. Film Studies majors practice the vital activities of analysis, synthesis, and multitasking that many employers seek. As a result, many Film Studies graduates find positions with film production companies, film archives, and festivals, or work as art managers, critics, journalists, independent artists, and teachers. Film Studies majors have been competitive in job searches nationally in the following areas:

  • independent or industrial filmmaker
  • film editor
  • critic or arts journalist
  • press agent
  • photographer
  • actor/actress, performer
  • studio merchandising or distribution company work
  • dramaturge or story editor
  • film archives, museum studies, program researcher
  • tourist industry or community arts worker
  • casting director or casting assistant
  • theater manager or publicist
  • television production, camera operator, censor, or colorizing technician
  • screenwriter, animator, script writer or script supervisor
  • library assistant or assistant language teacher
  • program assistant or a personal assistant to directors or producers
  • talent agent or talent representative
“CBU Film runs a great program for training storytellers of the future -don’t miss it!”

— Ralph Winter

(Producer of X-Men, Fantastic Four, Star Trek)

Student Work

Faculty

Film Engagement

CBU Film encourages its students to regularly engage in the film industry beyond the classroom. Between students submitting to film festivals, CBU hosting film festivals, and regular guest professors from Hollywood, CBU Film students are immersed into the broader film industry while earning their degree.

CBU Film Festival

The CBU annual film festival draws new student filmmakers and motivates returning students to try new ideas.  The film festival is serves as a forum for students to showcase their work in front of a public audience.  Since 2011, the CBU film festival has successfully brought together members of the public, CBU film students, and film critics into a common space.

Riverside International Film Festival

Since 2002, the Riverside International Film Festival has brought the best in contemporary international and independent film to the Inland Empire Region of Southern California, the fastest growing area in America.  CBU Film program regularly partners with, and showcases student film in conjunction with the Riverside International Film Festival.

Tournées Film Festival

The Tournées program is an initiative of the Franco-American Cultural Exchange, which is dedicated to fostering greater international awareness of French and Francophone cultures.  CBU is a proud host of the Tournées program whereby it can expose the CBU student population to a series of acclaimed French films.

Sundance Film Festival & Windrider Forum

In January, CBU Film Students attend the famed Sundance Film Festival.  While there, students also participate in the Windrider Forum, a Christian event that engages spirituality and ethics in contemporary film.

Los Angeles Film Studies Center

As a participant in the Coalition for Christian Colleges and Universities and a “sending institution” for the Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC), CBU gives students the opportunity to study for one semester through the Center in Los Angeles, California. Completion of this concentration is contingent upon admittance to the Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC) program. For more information see the LAFSC website, and for more samples of work from the LAFSC vimeo page.

International Service Projects

CBU is committed to fulfilling Jesus’ mandate in the Great Commission “to go and make disciples of all nations.” To this end, CBU believes that God bestows upon every student gifts and passions to accomplish their purpose. To that end, CBU sends out more students worldwide than any other college in the country.  For more information see the Office of Mobilization.

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